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Blog > Understanding Publishing – Posted on May 25, 2020

Where to Submit Short Stories: 20 Places Accepting Submissions

Writers who want to get their foot in the door of the publishing world should always be looking for outlets open to short story submissions. In many ways, these publications can serve as a training ground for aspiring authors — giving them experience in appealing to editors while also building their resumé and growing their fan base. They also offer the chance to get paid for your writing, which is nothing to be sniffed at.

If you are a budding poet or author looking for your first shot at glory, take a look at these publications currently accepting short story submissions in 2020.

AGNI

About: “We look for writing that catches experience before the crusts of habit form—poetry and prose that resist ideas about what a certain kind of writing “should do.” We seek out writers who tell their truths in their own words and convince us as we read that we’ve found something no one else could have written.”
Deadline: September 1 - May 31
Compensation: $10 per printed page
Word Count: No set word limit
Submission Guidelines: here

The Antioch Review

About: “We seldom publish more than three short stories in each issue. New writers as well as the previously published authors are welcome. It is the story that counts, a story worthy of the serious attention of the intelligent reader, a story that is compelling, written with distinction. Only rarely do we publish translations of well-known or new foreign writers. A chapter of a novel is welcome only if it can be read complete in itself as a short story.”
Deadline: September 1st - May 31st
Compensation: $20 per printed page and two copies of the issue
Word Count: Up to 5,000 words
Submission Guidelines: here

The Atlantic

About: “The Atlantic is always interested in great nonfiction, fiction, and poetry. A general familiarity with what we have published in the past is the best guide to what we're looking for.”
Deadline: Ongoing
Compensation: Payment for unsolicited submissions is not specified
Word Count: Unspecified
Submissions Guidelines: here

Black Warrior Review

About: “BWR publishes fiction, nonfiction, poetry, comics, and art twice a year. Contributors include Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winners alongside emerging writers. Work appearing in BWR has been reprinted in the Pushcart Prize series, Best American Short Stories, Best American Poetry, PEN/Robert J. Dau Short Story Prize, New Stories from the South, and other anthologies.”
Deadline: December 1st - March 1st, and June 1st - September 1st
Compensation: Payment for unsolicited submissions is not specified
Word Count: Up to 5,000 words for short stories, and up to 1,000 words for flash fiction
Submission Guidelines: here

Boulevard Magazine

About: “Boulevard strives to publish only the finest in fiction, poetry, and non-fiction. While we frequently publish writers with previous credits, we are very interested in less experienced or unpublished writers with exceptional promise. If you have practiced your craft and your work is the best it can be, send it to Boulevard.”
Deadline: October 1st - May 1st
Compensation: $100 - $300
Word Count: Up to 8,000 words
Submission Guidelines: here

Daily Science Fiction

About: “Daily Science Fiction (DSF) is a market accepting speculative fiction stories from 100 to 1,500 words in length. By this we mean science fiction, fantasy, slipstream, etc. We will consider flash series--three or more flash tales built around a common theme.”
Deadline: Ongoing outside of December 24th - January 2nd
Compensation: 8 cents per word
Word Count: 100 - 1,500
Submission Guidelines: here

The First Line

About: “Were you inspired by the fall 2008 first line (Roy owned the only drive-thru funeral business in Maine.) but didn't see the sentence until 2015? Or maybe you started writing a story for the spring 2005 issue (Life would be so much easier if I were a cartoon character.) but you never got around to submitting it. Or maybe you sent us a story that just missed the cut and you reworked it and want to try us again. Well, now is your chance to make up for missed opportunities.”
Deadline: February 1st (for Spring issue), May 1st (for Summer issue), August 1st (for Fall issue), November 1st (for Winter issue)
Compensation: $25 - $50
Word Count: 300 - 5,000
Submission Guidelines: here

The Georgia Review

About: “The Georgia Review publishes stories that range from flash fiction to novella-length work. Please submit only one story. Manuscripts must be double-spaced. Ordinarily, we do not publish novel excerpts, and we discourage authors from submitting these.”
Deadline: September to April
Compensation: $50 per printed page
Word Count: No set word limit
Submission Guidelines: here

The Incandescent Review

About: “We are looking for work that expresses honest opinions and emotional responses to timely and relevant personal or world issues. You are eligible for submission if you are between the ages of 13 and 22.”
Deadline: May 31
Compensation: Payment for unsolicited submissions is not specified
Word Count: No set word limit
Submission Guidelines: here

Levee Magazine

About: “Overall, we won’t know what we’ll love or hate until we see it. That being said, here are some guidelines to what we tend to enjoy: literary fiction, surrealism, magical realism, flash fiction, environmental writing.”
Deadline: June 1st - July 31st, January 1st - February 28th
Compensation: Payment for unsolicited submissions is not specified
Word Count: Up to 8,000 words
Submission Guidelines: here

New England Review

About: “We are looking for short stories, short shorts, novellas, novel excerpts (if they can stand alone), and translations. The word limit is 20,000. Please send only one piece at a time, unless the pieces are very short (under 1,000 words), in which case send up to three.”
Deadline: March 1 - May 31
Compensation: $20 per page
Word Count: Up to 20,000 words
Submission Guidelines: here

The New Yorker

About: “We read all submissions within ninety days, and will contact you if we’re interested in publishing your material. We regret that, owing to the volume of submissions we receive, we are unable to call or e-mail unless a story is accepted for publication. If you have not heard from us within ninety days, please assume that we will not be able to publish your manuscript.”
Deadline: Ongoing
Compensation: Payment for unsolicited submissions is not specified
Word Count: Unspecified
Submission Guidelines: here

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North American Review

About: “The North American Review is the oldest literary magazine in America (founded in 1815) and one of the most respected. We are interested in high-quality poetry, fiction, and nonfiction on any subject; however, we are especially interested in work that addresses contemporary North American concerns and issues, particularly with the environment, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and class.”
Deadline: Ongoing
Compensation: Payment for unsolicited submissions is not specified
Word Count: No set word limit
Submission Guidelines: here

One Story

About: “One Story is seeking literary fiction. Because of our format, we can only accept stories between 3,000 and 8,000 words. They can be any style and on any subject as long as they are good. We are looking for stories that leave readers feeling satisfied and are strong enough to stand alone.”
Deadline: January 15th - May 31st, and September 3rd - November 14th
Compensation: $500
Word Count: 3,000 - 8,000
Submission Guidelines: here

Ploughshares

About: “Ploughshares has published quality literature since 1971. Our award-winning literary journal is published four times a year; our lively literary blog publishes new writing daily. Since 1989, we have been based at Emerson College in downtown Boston.”
Deadline: Ongoing
Compensation: $45 per page
Word Count: Up to 7,500 words
Submission Guidelines: here

Story Magazine

About: “Story is a tri-annual print publication devoted to the complex and diverse world of narrative with a focus on fiction and nonfiction. Formerly a publication of York College, Story has reorganized as a non-profit, independent arts organization based in Columbus, Ohio.”
Deadline: Ongoing
Compensation: $10 per page
Word Count: Unspecified
Submission Guidelines: here

The Threepenny Review

About: Offering fiction, memoirs, poetry, essays and criticism to a readership of over 10,000, The Threepenny Review accepts short stories under 4,000 words and pays $400 per story.
Deadline: Ongoing
Compensation: $400
Word Count: Up to 4,000 words
Submission Guidelines: here

Vestal Review

About: “Launched in March of 2000, Vestal Review is the world’s oldest magazine dedicated exclusively to flash fiction.”
Deadline: February - May, and August - November
Compensation: $25
Word Count: Up to 500 words
Submission Guidelines: here

Zoetrope: All-Story

About: “Founded by Francis Ford Coppola in 1997, Zoetrope: All-Story is a quarterly print magazine of short fiction, one-act plays, and essays on film.”
Deadline: Ongoing
Compensation: Payment for unsolicited submissions is not specified
Word Count: Up to 7,000 words
Submission Guidelines: here

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Resources to help you nail your short story submissions

While these publications are some of our favorites, there are hundreds of other places you can submit your writing. Search for them here:

Or maybe you’re still working on your writing, and are not quite sure if it’s ready to send out to the world yet. If that’s the case, here are a few resources to help:

Finally, maybe you’re still at step one: you haven’t started writing yet and are waiting for inspiration to strike. Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered there as well:


What are some of the challenges or successes you’ve experienced while sending out short story submissions? Leave any thoughts or questions in the comments below!