Book Cover Art Gallery

Looking for design inspiration? Check out this collection of book cover art designed by professionals on Reedsy.

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Utopia PR  book cover, by Bailey McGinn
Son of the Cornfield book cover, by Erik Peterson
The Pain Habit book cover, by George Stevens
Cemetery Songs book cover, by Lisa Vega
Edge of Light book cover, by Rafael Andres
The World, Silently Spinning book cover, by Matthew Revert
Our Road to Damascus book cover, by Vanessa Mendozzi
Takakush book cover, by Kim Dingwall
Kong Boys book cover, by Xavier Comas
Annabel Pickering and the Sky Pirates: The Fantastical Contraption book cover, by Isabelle Arné
Leading with Grit and Grace book cover, by Susan Malikowski
Hidden book cover, by Lena Yang
Meredith book cover, by Daniel Benneworth-Gray
Begin Again book cover, by Danna Mathias
Entanglement book cover, by David Provolo
Hardship and Bliss book cover, by Mia Marie Overgaard
Windfall: A Henry Lysyk Mystery book cover, by Jamie Keenan

Need cover art for your book?

We have the professionals who can help, come meet the best book designers right here on Reedsy.

Deadly Keyholes book cover, by Matt Davies
Into The Glorious Unknown book cover, by Annemieke Beemster Leverenz
Black Flowers book cover, by Vince Haig
Women Utopia book cover, by Nick Castle
Hidden Beneath the Pines book cover, by Dan Van Oss
The Vicar Takes A Wife book cover, by Patrick Knowles
Messy Bed Messy Head book cover, by Stephanie Hannus
Katie Watson and the Painter's Plot book cover, by Patrick Knowles
Sun Wolf book cover, by Rafael Andres
The Detective book cover, by Hampton Lamoureux
The Angriest Angel book cover, by Caroline Teagle Johnson
You Can See More From Up Here book cover, by Jason Anscomb
Demon's Den book cover, by Dan Van Oss
The Orangutan Rescue Gang book cover, by Steve Mead
Wanderlust book cover, by David Provolo
Out of the Night book cover, by Mark Thomas
Civil Blood book cover, by Jake Clark
Runaways book cover, by Caroline Teagle Johnson
We Own the Sky book cover, by Caroline Teagle Johnson
Deconstructing Henry book cover, by David Provolo
This is You, This is Me book cover, by Jason Anscomb
In The Dancer's Shade book cover, by Micaela Alcaino
Flies in the Punch Bowl book cover, by Carlos Esparza
Kilts and Catnip: The Shrouded Isle book cover, by Hampton Lamoureux
Damaged Joy: Fixing Digital Experience book cover, by Vanessa Mendozzi
Causal Loops book cover, by Gareth Southwell
The Order of Nature book cover, by David Provolo
The Fabrications book cover, by Caroline Teagle Johnson
Fabler book cover, by Patrick Knowles
The Hawkman book cover, by Micaela Alcaino
Daughter, Disappeared book cover, by Mark Thomas
Ripples book cover, by Mark Thomas
The Waiting Room book cover, by Erik Peterson
Dusting Down Alcudia book cover, by Mia Marie Overgaard
Ropes in the Attic book cover, by Hampton Lamoureux
The Black Fox of Beckham book cover, by Sarah Beaudin
Dubai: An Insider's Guide book cover, by Mark Thomas
The Warbird book cover, by Caroline Teagle Johnson
Tokyo Firewall book cover, by Rafael Andres
Galloway's Justice book cover, by Jeffrey Nguyen
Out of Time: An Armour Black Mystery book cover, by Vince Haig
Color of Blood book cover, by Stewart Williams
The Twin Flame Game  book cover, by Vanessa Mendozzi
Mine: Untold Secrets book cover, by Dan Van Oss
Call Me Stewardess book cover, by Mary Ann Smith

Why is cover art so important?

Beyond all the clichés, book cover art plays an increasingly vital role in modern-day bookselling. With a majority of passionate readers now finding their books online, any book’s cover art must quickly attract their attention by standing out, communicating the book’s content and tone, and demonstrating its ‘production value’ — that is, to show the reader that they are looking at a professional-grade book.

This last point is especially important with independent publishing. When a reader considers whether to read a book, they tend to weigh up the potential costs: not just the financial cost of buying a book, but the time investment of reading it as well. A rough-around-the-edges cover design may suggest to some readers that little care has gone into the writing — which is usually not the case.

What are the other benefits of nicely designed book cover art?

Getting a professional book designer to work on your cover art isn’t just about making it look nice (though that’s important too, don’t get us wrong). It’s also about making sure that it’s fit for the market. The book designers at Reedsy have years of traditional publishing experience in their respective genres — they have an understanding of the prevailing trends and can help you create a book cover that signals the kind of book you’re publishing while also offering something new.

The ideal result is for casual browsers to be able to look at your cover art and immediately know what sort of book it is.

Will professional book cover art actually help me sell more copies?

There are many elements that factor into a reader’s purchase — but by and large, the answer is yes. Reedsy recently ran an experiment where we asked our professional designers to rebrand existing indie books. Using A/B testing with Facebook ads, we pitted the new covers against the original non-professional ones and found that the new designs could attract over 50% more interest from readers.

With Reedsy Discovery, where an author’s aim is to attract the interest of prospective reviewers and readers in order to get exposure, this bump that a professional cover offers can be immense.

What should I look for in a professional designer?

The three main factors in picking a designer are genre, budget, and taste.

Even if a designer has a 10-page-long resume, bestselling clients, and impeccable technique — if they don’t have experience in your genre, there’s no guarantee that they’ll deliver you the most appropriate design. If you are searching on Reedsy, you can filter your results by genre.

For your budget, it’s good to consider the level of experience that your designer brings to the table. The rule of thumb is that the more experienced your designer is (and the more prestigious authors they’ve worked with), the higher you can expect their quotes to be. To find out how much you can expect their services to cost, check out this post.

And of course, the final aspect to consider is taste: do you genuinely love their work? On each designer’s profile on Reedsy, you can browse through their portfolio and see the work that they’ve chosen to share. This will give you a good idea of their unique sensibilities. Ultimately, if you’re paying for cover art, you don’t want it to be something you grudgingly accept: you want it to be something you love.

Browse through Reedsy’s hand-picked community of book cover designers and ask for a free quote today.