Contest #107 winner 🏆

87 comments

Speculative Horror Contemporary

(Content Warning: Mental illness, gore, allusions to sexual abuse and violence)


I gots a demon in me; that's what Mama used to say. Mama would always be telling me that demons are all over this world, that they sneak up on little boys and girls and plant evil seeds in their heads that sprout and grow, spreading around their souls like an infection. It kinda be like when you don't wash a part of open, scabby skin; the spot around it starts to turn an ugly shade of yellow, then it gets sticky, and then you gots to clean it with a smelly, burning liquid that leaves the gash looking dark brown for a moment. 


Mama swore that for demons the only medicine needed was prayer. "Keep your hands tight and close to your chest. Imagine they're chained, bound by your faith in the Lord. Pray to him, my son, so that he may take your demon away."


But my demon don't go away. I see him in the shadows that bend all crooked like close to doorways. And I'm sure he hides in the bathroom mirror, tucking his slender body into the corners of the glass, just waiting for me to look elsewhere so he can snatch me and pull me into his reverse world, where the bad is very good, and the good is very bad.


I told Mama this; that he saw me brushing my teeth and spitting in the sink, so she grabbed me by the ear, dragged me into the bathroom, turned on the lights, and pointed straight into the mirror. "Where's the demon?" she asked. "If he's here, then I want to see him." 


But the demon didn't show himself. "You won't be able to see him, Mama," I said.


"For heaven's sake," she yelled, letting her spit fly over to my cheeks. She placed her hands on her hip and looked at me with her hair-raising eyes, the kind she always used before giving me a beating. "Why on Earth not?"


"Because Mama, he's invisible."


And so she burned my face with her hand, told me to go to my room and sleep. "Pray," she said, before having me leave the bathroom, "kneel by your bed and plea to the Lord so that he can take that demon, only you seem to be able to see, away." 


I put my knees on the ground, rested my elbows on my bed, kept my hands raised and my chin down. I begged, "Dear Lord," I sang, "can you guide my demon, take him and forever keep me safe?" Tears trickled down my face. "Please, I don't want him growing, taking over me like a weed, feeding on my fears, and making me think these awful things."


I said a Lord's Prayer: "Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name; thy kingdom come; thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven." 


I remembered Mama's words, her hand clutching the Rosary. She often recited ten Hail Marys whenever she felt the need to clear her mind, so I did the same. I didn't have any strings or beads, but I kept the number of the prayers alive in my head. I started with ten, then added another prayer for the Lord, followed by another ten Hail Marys, and repeated myself until my knees hurt and it was too hard to stand. 


*


Ten, that's how many times I blink as soon as I wake up. I place my right foot on the cold ground first, followed by then my right. Ten, that's how many times I pace from one end of my bedroom to the other before making my bed. Ten, that's how many Hail Marys I pray before even thinking about leaving my room for breakfast. Ten, that's how many steps I'm supposed to take from the doorway down to the stairwell. Ten, always ten; any more or any less, someone I love dies.


*


"Good morning, Jude," Father Vincent says with his head turned to the stove, cooking up a pan of scrambled eggs. 


"Mornin' Father Vincent," I return. I grab the kitchen chair by the top headrail, slide it out, back in, then out again until its wooden legs are aligned perfectly with the floor's tiles. I sit down and keep my arms off to the side because Father Vincent thinks it's impolite to place one's elbows on the table.


"Sleep well?"


"Not really," I answer. "I think I got about four hours of shut-eye."  


"How many?"


"How many what?"


"Hail Marys," he says, walking towards me with a smoking pan of eggs. 


I see it. The disappointment riddled across Father Vincent's face.


The eggs fly in the air. The scorching pan strikes me square in the head. My body's now on the floor, my lips nearly kissing his feet, his fist breaking my teeth. He laughs maniacally like a demon. 


"A hundred and ten," I answer.


"A good night's sleep is super important, Jude. You can't go on living like this. What's wrong with a hundred-nine, or even just ten."


"Ten Hail Marys aren't enough."


"And how do you know when it's enough."


"I just know."


*


Mama used to tell me that I was cursed. That a demon had latched onto my soul. She'd hear me talking to myself while pacing in my childhood bedroom. 


"Shut up," she'd always yell. "Go to sleep. What on Earth is wrong with you?"


"Nightmares," I'd tell myself. Nightmares that bloom and paint the black canvas of my eyes, pictures that break through the darkness of my headspace. He, my demon, never ceases to trace vivid images of things I know are not true; he uses a set of ornate, fabricated lies as a front. It's his way of keeping me terrified. 


*


The other boys are rounding up their plates and leaving the kitchen table. They stand and grab their dirty dishes, forks, and napkins. The chairs screech as some of them drag the legs back against the tiled floors.


One boy plants himself in front of the sink while another rolls up the plastic placemats. Another tall fellow scrapes everyones' leftover food into the garbage. 


The kitchen is flooded with the sounds of scurrying footsteps, dishes clanking, water running out of the faucet. 


The boy rolling up the placemats beside me has a knife tucked under his sleeve. He walks behind me, and the metallic tip shines from below his wrist. He reveals his weapon seconds before the boy in front of the sink has any chance to escape. He plunges the knife into the boy's gut. Blood seeps from the wound and trickles down his legs like piss. Everyone runs. He looks to me, knife in hand and serrated teeth, grinning. I'm next. 


"Hey Jude," the boy beside me asks, "you gonna take much longer, or can I take your mat?"


"Huh? I don't know, just leave it with me. I'll put it away once I'm done."


He stares at the food on my plate, the pile of scrambled eggs looking like curdled cheese and the sausage patty symmetrically cut into ten pieces. 


"Well, just make sure you finish eating before lunch," he answers, chuckling. "I swear, why the fuck do you take so long to eat?"


"WHAT DID I HEAR?" Father Vincent fires, entering the kitchen. 


"Nothing," all the boys reply in unison as if Father Vincent had asked each and every one of them. 


"Jude here is just taking an eternity to eat again," the boy by the sink responds, with a water stain over the front of his shirt, looking like an ink blotch. "He's going to skimp out on helping us clean up again, Father V."


"Tell you what," Father Vincent says. "How about you guys leave Jude and me to talk, and we'll clean up the kitchen by ourselves before lunch? Does that sound good?"


"Really?" some of the boys gush in disbelief. 


"Yeah, yeah, just scram before I change my mind," and in a flash, the sound of excited running invades the space, dissipating as each of the boys go upstairs or out through the front door to play in the yard.


"Don't forget to dry them dishes," one of the boys mocks before leaving the kitchen behind.  


*


Sometimes I'll see Father Vincent on top of me, his robe draping down from his chest and swaying over my thighs. The seamed edges of his gown will rub against my waist, expand and recede like the white scars that creep onto a sandy beach. 


He'll release a beastly sound, almost a tribal roar that'll echo and get absorbed into the sheets. His breath hot over my face, his eyes fixate on the bulge of my neck right before killing me.


*


"Jude, I'm starting to get worried about you," Father Vincent says. "I know things haven't been easy for you since your arrival, but —"


"But what?" 


"Your behavior," he says, "it's not exactly something that I understand." 


"Don't worry, Father Vincent," I assure him. "I'm fine," I say, shining him a smile. "It's no big deal. I'm great, see?"


"Come on, Jude, open up. You've been here for eight months, and you still haven't told us much of anything."


Father Vincent pulls out a chair and sits across from me. He crosses his arms and places them over the table. 


"I thought you didn't like it when we did that?"


"Well, we're not eating now, are we?" He returns. "You want to know something?" 


"What?" 


"I have terrible table manners," he answers, laughing. "But the boys here need to know how to mind their manners if they ever intend to leave here. Honestly, I'm not much of a stickler for the rules."


I scan Father Vincent from head to hands, notice his slouching, his head slightly arched forward as if at any moment he could jump over the table and grab me. 


"So," he continues. "I told you something about me, now how about you tell me something about yourself, Jude?"


"Do you really want to know?" 


"Lay it on me." 


"I have a demon." 


*


I have a demon, one that can't be seen. He isn't noticeable like a shadow or a voice, he's silent like the air I breathe. He speaks through thoughts and rituals, tasks that he can somehow force onto me.


I see him in the corridors, pushing me down the stairs or stretching his body from across the foot of my bed, trying to make a grab for my legs. 


I'll see him in what looks like dreams, strokes of light and color that occasionally bleed into reality. He'll take over a room, the objects, the people around me, and sometimes even toy with my body. 


The rituals, I need to follow them, even if they seem like nonsense to me. Tens, tens are sacred. Ten blinks, ten steps, ten prayers. I chew my food ten times on each side of my mouth. I must wash my hands ten times on each side every time I go to the bathroom, and I'm not allowed to leave the space before looking at the mirror. I need to make sure he sees me; he needs to be aware of each and every one of my performances.


He knows everything about me. I need to make sure he's pleased. If he's ever unhappy, he'll do something terrible. 


I pray every night for him to leave me. Prayers in sets of tens. Ten Hail Marys between each "Our Father," followed by cramping legs and burning knees. This is probably the most valuable task among all the others. 


Once my eyes were heavy from such a tiring evening and a brutal beating that I fell asleep before completing my nightly ceremony. That night, I woke up, and my demon had taken Mama away from me.


*


There's a golden cross on the pulpit, glimmering from the chandelier basking the church in a warm, yellow glow. Father Vincent told me to meet him here, "We'll talk more after lunch," he said.  


We talked the entire time we cleaned the kitchen. Father Vincent asked me about everything that my demon had ever made me do. I told him about the thoughts, the prayer, how Mama hit me each time I mentioned the demon. 


"And how do you know it's a demon?" he asked. 


"Mama told me. She said my father had a demon too. A kind that made him do crazy things. It forced him to go into drinking and make long cuts down his arms. Mama said that my father had this thing with being clean and keeping everything in pristine condition. He wouldn't touch certain things, and his demon only ever let him be when he was in church under the protection of the Lord."


"I see. And what about you? Do you think your demon fears the Lord?" 


"I think so. I don't know. Maybe?"


The doors from the entrance bang and echo through down the sea of benches. Father Vincent walks down the aisle with a woman in a pencil skirt, a brown blazer, and turtle shell glasses."


"Jude," Father Vincent begins, "this is Dr. Wong." 


"Nice to meet you, Jude," she says, stretching out her arm. "You can call me Lucy."


I stare at her wrinkled knuckles and the contouring lines of her palm and fingers. I don't raise a finger to greet her, and so she retracts her hand. 


"A doctor?"


"Yes, Jude. Lucy here is a doctor and a dear old friend. I asked her to come down here to speak to you."


"About what?" I fire, looking to Father Vincent and then diverting my gaze to Lucy. 


"Well, let's say I think I can help you out, Jude. That is if you're willing to speak to me."


"What do you mean?" I return.


"Vincent told me you have a demon. Is that correct?" 


I nod. 


"Tell me, how do you live with this demon?"


"I do what he wants. I try to keep things in order just the way he likes it. I also pray."


"Does it always work?"


"Most of the time," I answer. 


"And how do you feel about that? About having to do all of these things?" 


"Honestly? I feel pretty tired."


"Anything else?" 


"Shameful."


Dr. Wong squats down beside the bench where I'm sitting. Father Vincent takes a seat directly behind me. 


"We want to see if we can offer you some relief, Jude. A way to help you out that doesn't involve keeping you awake most of the night in prayer."


"NO!" I blurt out. "I need to pray. Prayer is what keeps him at bay."


"No, Jude, it doesn't," Dr. Wong interjects. "The truth is your demon isn't exactly the type that will simply go away like that."


"What? But Mama said —"


"We know Jude," Father Vincent replies. "But how about you talk to Dr. Wong for a bit. Tell her anything you want, tell her everything you told me."


I look to Dr. Wong, her thin eyes bouncing back at me. 


"You're a doctor, right? Am I sick?" 


"Let's just say your demon isn't exactly what you think it is," she answers. Dr. Wong stands, rests her hand on the arm of the church bench. "Do you mind if I sit?" she asks, pointing to the space beside me.


"Sure," I answer. "One question, though?"


"And what's that?" 


"Do you really think you can help me?"


August 21, 2021 03:40

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87 comments

K. Antonio
15:08 Aug 27, 2021

OMG, OMG, OMG. I won! 🤯🤯 Honestly, the fact I won is surprising because I know this piece is experimental, maybe even a bit risky, and not everybody's cup of tea. I want to thank everyone who read and commented, the positive feedback was very encouraging. I'm always a bit insecure about my writing, but I've been lucky to have people reading and always pushing me to raise the bar. This week I was thinking about a few quotes, somethings one of my favorite authors, Neil Gaiman says: --"Honesty matters. Vulnerability matters. Being open...

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H L Mc Quaid
15:13 Aug 27, 2021

Yaaaaaaas! 💕💃🎊🎉

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K. Antonio
16:38 Aug 27, 2021

I had to hold back the desire to twerk after seeing this comment xD

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H L Mc Quaid
17:11 Aug 27, 2021

Don't hold back. Let your freak fly, my friend.

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Michelle Gregory
03:51 Aug 29, 2021

I very much understand the horror of OCD. My daughter had it as a child, I think she has more control over it as an adult. I personally suffered somewhat as a child too. Well done.

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Ethan Li
01:03 Aug 30, 2021

This actually happens. My numbers were 3 and 9.

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A.Dot Ram
21:22 Aug 30, 2021

Such great thoughts on writing! Thanks for sharing, and thanks for sharing your experience (even though not literal, I think we get the flavor of it). That's something I'm often self conscious about, especially in my darker stories. Like, none of this happened to me, but it came from me and taps into some truth I perceive. But good stories are vulnerable like that. The "truer" it rings, the harder it hits. We either recognize it, or in this case trust it and learn. Thanks for being brave.

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K. Antonio
03:49 Aug 21, 2021

I never posted a story so close to the deadline, but seeing as I had some money to burn 🤣😂 and I haven't put anything out in over 2 weeks, I thought what the hell... This story is DARK, probably even for me. I was in a way inspired by the book "In The Dream House" where the author incorporates some aspects of horror into her memoir. I wanted to play with something personal and exaggerate and stretch it into the realms of fiction. I've mentioned it a few times on here, but I suffer from Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, and what that means is...

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Michael Martin
20:35 Aug 22, 2021

Ah... that makes more sense now. (I read this comment after leaving mine.) Looking back, the correlation between the exacting nature of Jude's idiosyncrasies and OCD makes perfect sense, but my mind was never in that place (and never reached that place either, obviously lol). It didn't even cross my mind that we were talking about OCD, but that's likely because of how well you framed the early "demon" scene - making me believe that Jude legitimately saw something. So OCD wasn't the first thing that came to mind, even when it became obvio...

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K. Antonio
20:50 Aug 22, 2021

🤣🤣😅 It happens. Honestly, OCD is really hard to portray because its manifestations are very untraceable. Some people fear contamination, some people end up obsessing over symmetry or repetition, and I didn't want to give too much away quickly nor dive into those aspects. Framing it all as a demon, and having Jude believe it (and having religion and his mother play off that) allowed me to, I guess, shy away from keeping the story a bit clinical while playing around with horror. Trust me, it wasn't so much my goal to have everyone understa...

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Sara Hf
17:02 Aug 27, 2021

Very interesting. The way you described OCD was so accurate it made it pretty clear it was coming out from someone who really experienced it. It was great and very well delivered. The visuals were very clear. Excellent job and I hope you get better.

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Mickey Mousey123
09:50 Sep 18, 2021

OCD can be very crippling and without meds and treatment from professionals many suffer from that, u did a wonderful job putting yourself in the character's heart, nice piece of writing.

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H L Mc Quaid
13:51 Aug 25, 2021

This made me think a lot about childhood trauma and how many 'conditions' that children (and adults) are diagnosed with (eg ADHD, oppositional defiant disorder) are the echoes of coping mechanisms that helped kids survive. Ps I'm reading The Body Keeps The Score, and it's given me incredible insight into why trauma survivors struggle with exorcising "dysfunctional" behaviours.

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Beth Connor
18:11 Aug 23, 2021

What a brilliant portrayal of Judes OCD. I always try to read the story before the comments, and in this case, I am so glad I did. This was dark, and parts were hard to read. First-person was definitely a good choice because we as readers were allowed to ride along with Jude, and experience first hand how his illness manifests. I imaging his upbringing contributes to the OCD manifesting as a demon. As a reader, I was confused at first- I didn't know what was in his head, or real. I think this was your intent, and by the end of the stor...

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K. Antonio
18:22 Aug 23, 2021

Yes, for sure! Thanks for the comments :D

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Shea West
05:41 Aug 22, 2021

K.😭😭 First of all, I suspect that this story is for many more people than not. What you're speaking about whether fictionalized or not is a very true reality for many. You are incredibly transparent in sharing your own experiences, and by doing so someone will say, "Ah, I'm not alone in this." That's worth something if you ask me. I personally had a few month bout of Postpartum OCD after my first child was born. I had two near death experiences, one during birth and one 5 weeks postpartum that left me as a Petri dish for a slew of PMAD's ...

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Shea West
00:42 Aug 23, 2021

I came back to say, you'd think that getting something catchy in your head like Lady Gaga's "Bad Romance" wouldn't be so terrible.....but it was terrible for so many other reasons.

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A.Dot Ram
23:27 Aug 30, 2021

Wow! I got things stuck in my head in loops so hard in the early post partum weeks, both times. I never really thought about it till now. Also I couldn't sleep. Yeah, normalize this shit!

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Karla Otte
18:35 Aug 27, 2021

This was incredibly well written. I have undiagnosed OCD (working on getting it diagnosed 😅), and while I don't have the numbers thing, as soon as I started the story, I was like, this is 100% about OCD. Or is at least an incredibly accurate representation of it (prior to reading your below comment). I was raised religiously as well, but had never even considered that religious repetition could lend itself to OCD like that! Very very powerful. Glad I gave it a read! Best of luck 💕

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K. Antonio
22:08 Aug 27, 2021

Thanks! In my case OCD is in my family history so I was exposed to the compulsions of others and thus realized I had some too. Funny enough, the only number compulsion I have ever experienced involved praying in clusters of nine, so in a way, I guess that made it onto my story. I'm glad the piece resonated with you! It makes me happy to know that people enjoyed the piece, THANKS AGAIN!

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Rhondalise Mitza
18:12 Aug 27, 2021

Congratulations! Have you read A Little Life? This reminded me a lot of that, but of course you had a winning twist and personal style to it that made it all your own. It could be just the names and the monastery setting but if you haven't read that book I would recommend it, sounds right up your alley.

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K. Antonio
18:18 Aug 27, 2021

I HAVE READ A LITTLE LIFE! I loved Jude, but ultimately I wished the story was more hopeful. I read it a couple months ago, but I still think that the story left a scar on my soul. 🤣😅

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Rhondalise Mitza
00:49 Aug 29, 2021

Oh it definitely left a scar on my soul! I'm glad you read it, I was hoping you had!

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Lindsay E
16:53 Aug 27, 2021

A well deserved win. I recently read 'In the Dream House' and can attest that you evoked a similar eerie feeling in me when I read your piece. Congratulations!

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Beth Connor
16:34 Aug 27, 2021

Well deserved K! you are on fire :-)

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K. Antonio
16:37 Aug 27, 2021

I'm a bit speechless, and gitty. I have to teach today, but I'm such in a good mood maybe I'll even play a game with my students. 😂😂

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Beth Connor
17:58 Aug 27, 2021

Haha! Your students are going to catch on and make sure you win every week 😂 A wonderful way to start the weekend.

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Sarah Desouza
16:33 Aug 27, 2021

Well written. I feel for the protagonist, he seems so innocent. A change of perspective would have altered his destiny.

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Matthew Langford
15:45 Aug 27, 2021

Very well written, I wasn't going to read it but was hooked by the first paragraph and your use of language. Also a very relatable story, I think many of us have our own superstitions about what brings bad luck and could really understand what the boy was going through.

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A.Dot Ram
15:22 Aug 27, 2021

#3!!! 🏆🏆🏆I look forward to reading soon but won't delay my congratulations.

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Shea West
15:13 Aug 27, 2021

k!!!!!!!! You did it again my friend. I am so proud of you and this story you created. You so deserved this win. I was just telling Beth Connor how damn talented you are, that you should save some of that talent for the rest of us. But I gotta say, your writing is a gift to the rest of us. Keep it up!

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K. Antonio
16:01 Aug 27, 2021

I'm a bit shaken that this won. I knew that the nightmare sequences and the structure would throw people off, but at the same time I'm happy that the piece did well. I very rarely talk about my mental health, but this year I've really been trying to open up about it and let others know about my condition and reality. It's been mostly positive for the most part. Crazy though that I got the triple crown. Especially considering the weekly talent pool. I'm just thankful for having found so many great people on here.

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Shea West
19:58 Aug 27, 2021

I'm grateful for your vulnerability and honesty with your mental health. Normalize the hard shit! It's something you live and breathe everyday and I bet there are others that do too. A triple crown that is beyond deserved! Buy yourself something nice ;)

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Jon R. Miller
13:36 Aug 21, 2021

This is such an excellent portrayal of what Jude is going through. I am stunned! Jude's descriptions of what the demon makes him do, the rituals of "ten", really resonate with me. Though not to the extent as Jude, I kind of relate with him because I repeat a lot of actions in daily life and habitually check all the windows and door locks (and make sure the stovetop is turned off) numerous times before leaving the house, and I get obsessed with it, worrying many times during the day whether I actually did leave everything turned off and lo...

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K. Antonio
13:54 Aug 21, 2021

OMG! Thanks a bunch for catching those typos. I had to speed through while writing this last night, so catching those little mistakes really helps me out. I'm glad that the story resonated with you. (Lately I`ve also been checking to make sure the stovetop is turned off too). Although the story is a fictionalized and even gruesome rendition of something I live with, I was fearful that some people just wouldn't "get it", so this comment makes me happy! I think the part about OCD being difficult to talk about to be pretty true, specially w...

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Jon R. Miller
15:04 Aug 27, 2021

Congratulations!!!!!! :>

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K. Antonio
15:15 Aug 27, 2021

I CAN'T BELIEVE YOU CALLED IT!

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Jon R. Miller
15:18 Aug 27, 2021

I was so sure this had a good chance! And I also wanted it to win. :>

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Jon Casper
11:41 Aug 21, 2021

Very intriguing to frame the disorder as a demon. I can certainly see how some might perceive it this way. I was impressed by how you portrayed the intrusive thoughts, working their way into everyday events. The dialogue is excellent, and the characters are interesting. I felt a lot of compassion for Jude.

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Jude S. Walko
07:33 Aug 29, 2021

I liked how this story went from Jude's internalized POV, to his position in the external world, and then back and forth. It really added to the confusion and isolation I imagine the character must have felt. Side note, my name is Jude and I was a seminarian for a long time in formation to be a Catholic priest. The priest whom I most looked up to, as a mentor, and who was mainly responsible for my formation was named Father Vincent. Uncanny, right? Luckily for me that's where the similarities end. Great story, looking forward to more.

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K. Antonio
10:01 Aug 29, 2021

OH WOW! I grew up pretty religious (not so much now) and believe it or not, Father Vincent was actually the name of one of the nicest priests I met and did volunteer work for. To this day I remember his kindness and just how cool I thought he was. Thanks a bunch for the comment. Glad you enjoyed!

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Karen Kinley
18:25 Aug 28, 2021

Wow! What an amazing story! And congrats on the win! As someone who also suffers from OCD (not too severe anymore), I picked up on Jude's "demon" right away! But the way you slowly unfolded the details, allowing the reader to come to that conclusion on their own or to simply wonder what kind of affliction would cause this...BRILLIANT! I like that you took the obtrusive thoughts into the horror realm. It added quite an extra layer. I have to say, though, that I have had those thoughts that involved me harming my children and my "demon" made...

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K. Antonio
18:36 Aug 28, 2021

I'm so happy someone caught on to the idea of Jude's mom's death being related to his demon. It was a subtle little hint I wanted to sneak in there (the idea of bad outcomes from not satisfying rituals). It's funny, I don't have any number rituals anymore (maybe one day they'll return). When I was a child I did, it sort of waned. But intrusive thoughts, damn those are A BUMMER (downsizing the word for straight up f*ckery). As a teacher I can relate to the idea of harming children, but some of my obsessions/compulsions over time have dissip...

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Zahra Naazir
17:35 Aug 28, 2021

Omg. This is amazing! I think it's in the small details. The innocence of your character really does reel us in.. hoping for good to come soon. A very emotional piece. Great job!

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Oliver Bisky
17:04 Aug 28, 2021

WOW!!!!! This was so intense in all the best ways. In particular, your portrayal of intrusive thoughts was also amazing, especially considering its sheer accuracy. All forms of OCD live by rituals, whether contamination-related or just Pure-O, and connecting that sense of toxic devotion/obsession to religion adds a whole new layer of complexity that I could relate to. Intrusive thoughts are a personal hell. They damn you for things you haven't done, and would never do. I think I love the significance of Jude's name, most of all. We all know...

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Blue Green
07:05 Aug 28, 2021

Congrats on a well-deserved win! This is a remarkable story!

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