Stories on a Train - Xinjiang 1995

Submitted into Contest #168 in response to: Make a train station an important part of your story.... view prompt

26 comments

Creative Nonfiction East Asian

As I stand on a crowded train platform in Beijing, baking in the summer heat waiting for a train that hasn't arrived for an alarmingly long time, a very tall Western male with shaggy gray hair approaches.


“We should travel together, it’s safer that way,” he says with a strong Australian accent. I had never met an Australian before.


“What do you mean?” I stall and try to figure out who he is and why I would need to travel with this widly exotic individual. But I also might be lost and don’t speak the local language. “My train should have left 20 minutes ago. I’m not even sure if this is the right platform.”


“You are going to Urumqi, Xinjiang?”


“Yes.”


“Then you are in the right place. The train will arrive when it wants to,” he says philosophically and looks at the people waiting around us. “Everyone here is going to Urumqi.”


“Then, let’s stick together.” The man looks like he knows what he’s doing. 


His name is Gary and while waiting another hour for the 10:45 am train to arrive, I fill him in on what I have been doing in Beijing up until now.


Three months earlier outside of a day trip to Canada I had never left the United States and had barely been out of my hometown. I had recently graduated university, and having not found a job yet the future was looking uncertain when I was notified I would receive a small but unexpected financial windfall. Possessing a moderate amount of savings for the first time in my life, this might be a narrow window of opportunity to see more of the world before responsibilites tie me down. At the local bookstore I picked up a stack of Lonely Planet guidebooks, the only source of information about cheap lodgings and hotels around the world in the 1990s, and next week booked a flight to China. My ambition was to start in Shanghai and travel from Asia to Europe by land on the cheap.


In Beijing, at the crowded train platform, people around us begin picking up their bags. The Xinjiang-bound train soon arrives and everyone pushes for the doors. People getting off the train do gladitorial battle to get their suitcases past the people pushing in. Gary, with his bulk and commanding presence, powers through the melee and I follow in his wake.


Marching through the aisle of a 2nd class train carriage, he commandeers two bunks. The car is partitioned into groups of 6 beds stacked 3 high with a narrow space between them holding a small table. The top bed is 7 feet above the ground. A local man climbs up and disappears from view for the next three days. Myself and Gary take the 2 bunks below him.


Across from us, a Chinese family group of a middle-aged mother and her two teen children spread their belongs over their 3 beds.


After we organize our belonging, they convert the bottom beds into chairs and we all sit facing each other. The Chinese mother smiles at me.


“Hello, I am Chen, I am a doctor,” she says. ”You are American?”


She talks while writing Chinese characters and slowly translating them into written English.


“Yes. Ni Hao,” I say. 


“America is very rich...” she hesitates. “What is your salary?” Her two children are looking at me waiting to hear my answer.


I reply, “I don’t have a job right now so I don't have a salary.”


She looks disappointed at this answer and then explains her income. “As a doctor I make 200 renminbi, a month. But the government gives us an apartment and food coupons.”


I calculate her salary is about 20 US dollars a month. I say it’s great she has a free apartment.


She continues to grill me and asks, “How much money do you have in your bank account?” 


I avoid answering, afraid my answers could make them feel bad about themselves, or about me. Or possibly attract criminal attention. I pull out my travel guide and look through it without answering. She goes back to organizing her family’s belongings.


Gary nudges me and says, “I’m a journalist. Right now, I’m freelancing for The Lonely Planet.”


“Really? That’s fascinating,” I say feeling fortunate to have such an illustrious new travel companion. “Where have you been to?”


“I’ve been on the road 7 months. I’ve written parts of the Laos and Cambodia editions,” he says. “China is an amazing country. Have you been to Yunnan, Chongqing, or Yangzhou?”


“No, as a tourist, I’ve only been to Shanghai and Beijing.”


“We are not tourists. The proper word is traveler.”


“Yes. I am a traveler! That sounds a lot better.”


“Tourists come for a week and stay at 5-star hotels,” he says, “Travelers live with the people and experience the culture. If we spend an hour to wait for a train, that’s not a problem for a traveler. As a wise man once said, the pauses in the music are also a part of the music.”


Gary has an enormous backpack. I ask him what supplies he has but he doesn’t say. For the 3-day 2-night journey to Urumqi, I had obtained 3 cans of Pringles and 2 packets of M&Ms from the street vendor below my hostel. I bought 2 flat breads from a vendor who handed them to me in a loose plastic bag. Looking at them now, I see they have become dirty.


As the train begins moving, my bowels are also set into motion. I venture down the rattling train carriage and find a toilet at the far end. I open the door and see the toilet is merely a hole in the floor. Below, the railroad ties are flying past at 70 miles per hour. Defecating over a violently moving commotion feels unsafe. As I squat down holding onto the railing tightly, I see the movement of the train has caused a lot of previous occupants to miss the target. For the rest of the trip, I drink as little water as possible to limit trips to this nightmare scene. I don’t realize it yet, but I will have the worst dysentery of my life in 3 days.


When I return to my seat, Gary is in a talkative mood and tells a story. “China is a wild country. Last month, I took a bus in Tibet from Lhasa to Nagarze. There were 2 buses. We were in the front bus. After a three hour drive we arrived at the village but the bus behind us never showed up. We sat eating and drinking beer at the local cafe late into the night when we saw lights coming up the road. People from the other bus were walking into the village carrying flashlights and their suitcases. A foreigner told us what happened. Going down a hill, the bus driver yelled something in the local language and jumped out the door. The locals on the bus started jumping out the windows. The brakes were shot. Well, the foreigner didn’t know what the driver said or what was happening, but thought he’d better jump out the window too. A few seconds later, the bus went off the road and rolled down the mountain. Luckily, it stopped about 50 meters down the slope, so they climbed down and fetched their suitcases off the top of the bus.”


I’m gripped by the ethical dilemma within the story. “I’m surprised the driver jumped out first instead of trying to guide the bus,” I say.


“Everyone for themselves here. Life is cheap.”


Later that night, when I take my shirt off to change clothes, everyone else looks away, but I see Gary looking at my torso. It feels odd.


On the second morning, I run out of Pringles and M&Ms. I must have looked forlorn as without asking the Chen family begins to offer me things to eat. It starts with watermelon slices, then sunflower seeds and hardboiled eggs from the bag they’ve brought along.


She asks me to sing and begins humming ‘Yesterday Once More’ by The Carpenters. The song fills me with nostalgia for weekend drives in Wisconsin with my parents, and I sing the words I remember.


Later that afternoon she gives me an instant cup of noodles made with boiling water she obtained from somewhere while telling the other 30 people around us she is feeding The American. Gary refuses her offer and says he will stick to his own food supply.


I eat the cup of noodles hungrily. After I’m finished, I hold the empty styrofoam bowl in my hands. Mother Chen gestures to throw it out the window. I grin sheepishly not wanting to litter. She gestures toward the window again. I give in and throw the plastic cup out the window.


“What the fuck are you doing mate?” Gary grunts, and stares at me with a mixture of shock and anger. 


“They, are throwing them out the window,” I say.


“We need to set a good example for them,” he says sternly.


He walks over and makes a show of putting the plastic wrapper from his packaged meal into a dustbin in the aisle.


After lunch, we watch the desert terrain west of Xian fly past, enveloped by the sounds of rattling windows and doors, and the aroma of watermelon juice roasting in the sun, day-old roast chicken, machine oil and a distant stench from the toilet.


I notice a cleaner coming into our carriage doing a superficial attempt to pick up the worst of the watermelon refuse and eggshells on the floor. When she reaches the middle section of the carriage, she picks up our dustbin and carries it away.


Out of curiosity, I wonder where she is taking it and poke my head into the aisle. The cleaner walks to the end of the carriage, holds the dustbin out the door with two hands, and shakes out its contents, sending them flying in an airborne trail fluttering in the wind alongside the train.


Gary is reading a book and hasn't seen all of this. I consider telling him, but decide it's more diplomatic to save this information for later.


The train goes past the industrial city of Lanzhou. The scenery has gradually grown drier and dustier as the train moves West. The nights are now frigid cold while the days have become scorching hot.


“Keep on eye on your belongings at all times,” Gary says.


I turn my gaze from the window and listen what he has to say.


“A mate of mine, Paul, was on a train like this, travelling alone. He went to the toilet and told the family next to him to watch his bag, but when he came back the backpack was gone. The family said they didn’t know anything.”


I ask Gary, “The family was there, did they take it?”


“Good question! So Paul goes and finds the police on the train. Every long-distance train has two policemen on it.”


“Did they help him find it?”


“The police come talk to the family and put the screws in. They point out another man on the train. They search the guy and sure enough, find the backpack and give it back to Paul.”


“So all was fine?”


“The story’s not finished yet. The train was travelling through the middle of nowhere, somewhere like here.” Gary points out the window. “The police stop the train. They take the man into a field. And shoot him dead.”


“Oh my god. Did they just leave him there?” I ask.


“Yes, just like that. Bam. The man who had his backpack stolen said there wasn’t even anything important in it. He never would have asked for it back had he known that would happen.”


“This story is almost unbelievable. Shot a man dead for a backpack?”


“I knew Paul. A solid guy who would never lie about anything. True story mate.”


The next day, we arrive at Xinjiang’s central city of Urumqi. The Chen family politely says goodbye and wishes me the best on my future travels. 


As we’re getting off the train Gary asks, “I’m staying at the best hotel in the city, the Grand Hotel, do you want to split a room, $50 each?” 


“That’s out of my price range. I’m going to a $10 hostel,” I reply.


“Well, We’re going in the same direction. Let's share a taxi.” 


We get into a car and Gary directs the driver to drop him off first. 


After a long ride through the large city of Urumqi, which appears divided into Chinese and Muslim districts with a heavy police presence throughout the city, our taxi finally arrives at the Grand Hotel’s palatial entrance. For a man who has been very verbose the previous three days, Gary says goodbye very tersely, grabs his bag and walks toward the entrance. Perhaps he’s eagerly looking forward to a hotel room and a warm shower. Then, I realize he has forgotten to pay his share of the taxi fare. I get out of the taxi and chase him into the lobby. He says It's slipped his mind, and hands me ten dollars. As a backpacker, ten dollars pays for another day of travel.


For the next several years each time I go to a bookstore I visit the Travel section, find a shelf of Lonely Planet guidebooks and flip through the front pages looking for Gary’s name but never find it.


Was Gary a spy using me for cover? An international drifter telling stories to impress rubes? Is receiving food when hungry more important than issues of geopolitics? And is plastic waste thrown out of a train window any different than that sent to an unseen landfill? I simply don't know. This story is merely a retelling of my personal experiences on a train journey in a unique and vast country 27 years ago.

October 20, 2022 17:05

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26 comments

Zelda C. Thorne
17:34 Oct 23, 2022

Wow this is so good. You nailed the non-fiction narrative, which imo is super hard to do. Highlights for me were: - the woman asking all those questions about how much money he had. A similar thing happened to me in India. Very uncomfortable! - the litter being thrown out the train - the end. Who was Gary? As frustrating as it is, I like not knowing. The mystery adds sth to the story, and travelling is often like that. Well done. Another great story. Good luck!

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18:10 Oct 23, 2022

Thx so much for reading and commenting. Yes, without a plot non-fiction is hard..happy to hear contrasting characters worked out. And Its interesting that the quirky details were of more interest than the wild stories (travel legends?) that I was told by fellow travelers. Sounds like you had some similar experiences in India.

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Rama Shaar
10:43 Oct 23, 2022

This was a gripping read! It flowed very well and gave an entertaining and authentic insight into travelling in a very unfamiliar part of the world from an inexperienced young person's point of view.

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16:09 Oct 23, 2022

Thanks happy it flowed well (so many edits) and I got the mood of my younger self meeting various characters who are sometimes 'unreliable narrators'.

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Michał Przywara
22:50 Oct 20, 2022

This is great! Creative non-fiction terrifies me, because the idea of turning the mundanity of real life into engaging reading, well, is intimidating. But this story hits a lot of nice notes. There's all sorts of contrasts here, and they all seem to circle Gary. He warns you to be wary of the locals, of theft, but they offer food freely, and in the case of Min, guidance. He's dismissive of the locals, saying you must set a good example for them. The implication is they are filthy, because they litter. But the trash can is just a ruse, as t...

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07:33 Oct 21, 2022

Thanks for reading and picking up the nuances I was trying to get across. A lot of people just assume the worst in china, but then people I encountered through my travels were actually very open and helpful. The story is a bit long, if there are any parts you remember that were boring or felt wrong please let me know and I'll shorten them.

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Tommy Goround
20:48 Oct 21, 2022

See... Gary as English goes right with Dan's excellent history of the British empire. Also, what's it like to meet your hero? You're in the middle of nowhere and you meet Indiana jones. That's the story. That's probably what we were dancing around. If you can bring out the love for Gary and his lifestyle and it just happens to take place in China on accident.... Boom. That's the story. It doesn't have to be nonfiction creative To both M.Pryz and Scott.... Are you guys strung up on the fact that nonfiction requires authenticity? Essays do....

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Chandler Wilson
20:49 Oct 20, 2022

The story moves along well. I really like where you've landed with your voice and style. The characters are totally believable and real. Especially liked the reference to Wisconsin and a new life. Curious ending. Was Gary lying, or maybe not real?

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21:02 Oct 20, 2022

That's exactly what happened in real life. I never figured it all out. Maybe he was some sort of spy using me for cover? He did go to an extremely expensive hotel which was odd. And try to run off without paying for the taxi. Maybe I just got on his nerves in some way or he was just busy who knows. The thing was he clearly said he was a Lonely Planet writer, and then for years I never saw his name listed. He was def up to something.

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Chandler Wilson
22:34 Oct 20, 2022

Guess it's true. Real life is stranger than fiction. Great story!

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Craig Westmore
20:16 Oct 20, 2022

The narrative flows well. You are really in your element with this genre, Scott. I enjoyed the characters and setting. You described them in way that I could feel each moment. I'm not familiar with creative nonfiction so I'm not sure if it follows a plot. Is there a theme or message that you want to convey with this story?

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20:59 Oct 20, 2022

More the contrast of Gary with a lot of high ideals but questionable personal behaviour and the local people (without a lot of money) who might perhaps be in a bad system but are giving me food and being genuinely nice. A summary of my experiences that happened over about a month but compressed into a few days. I actually have no idea if Gary was a free lance writer and maybe I just didn't see his name, or some sort of spy, or just a drifter making up big stories to impress people. But he did run off and try to not pay for the taxi which wa...

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Kelsey H
05:25 Oct 27, 2022

I really enjoyed this, love your descriptions of the train ride and the people you met, sounds like a very interesting journey although the toilet situation would be horrific!

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09:45 Oct 27, 2022

Thanks for reading kelsey! Yes, it was an amazing trip, being able to have a lot of free time back then let me have a really unique experience. Everyone was still on bicycles and wearing blue uniforms back then, so different from today.

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Mike Panasitti
13:52 Oct 25, 2022

Scott, great story. Do you really remember the conversations you had 27 years ago, or do you embellish, or fictionalize them at all? I'm in the process of writing a memoir and would like to include dialogue as you have here, but am thwarted by a very imperfect memory. Any suggestions?

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14:16 Oct 25, 2022

The major parts of this story are exactly what happened but things do need to be compressed a bit for good flow. Gary I met on a bus ride (out of) Xinjiang, and the family on the train ride in. And a few of the little side stories were with other people I met in china that I merged into gary and the famliiy. The cleaning lady throwing the dustbin out the train door was too ironic to forget. China has modernized so much and that wouldn't happen anymore. The exact words people said I don't remember and I have to write what's closest to thei...

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Mike Panasitti
22:15 Oct 28, 2022

Thanks for the clarifications Scott. You did a great job with this story.

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Philip Ebuluofor
09:33 Oct 25, 2022

Fine work Scott.

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Daniel Allen
10:39 Oct 21, 2022

Really enjoyed this. You created a really powerful picture of China and it's people. I almost felt like I was on the train with you. I found Gary to be a particularly intriguing character, with his odd blend of know-how and pretentiousness

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11:38 Oct 21, 2022

Thanks Daniel, happy you enjoyed it. Never did figure out exactly who Gary was, perhaps just a fellow traveler embellishing his own back story a bit, but he had travelled all over Se Asia which was interesting, think he mentioned he was ex-austrlaian military from what I remember.

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Calm Shark
00:21 Oct 21, 2022

Hi Scott, hope you are having a good day so far. I love the adventures that you have gone through and creative nonfiction is now my favorite genre to read now. Keep up the stories! (P.S, do you write freestyle(without an outline) or do you follow an outline?)

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16:21 Oct 23, 2022

Hi Calm, sorry for the late reply. Once I have an idea, I begin a google doc (so its on my mobile also) and for the next 2-3 days just type notes of plot twists or lines of dialogue that might be interesting to the story. Like when I'm watching TV or walking around if I think of something I'll add a note to the doc in my mobile. When I have about 10 small ideas ("gary says the pause are part of the music , and gives a speech") I'll just start writing and fill in the details in between them. I find I can't write 1,000 words if I don't have...

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Calm Shark
18:30 Oct 23, 2022

Oh, don't worry about replying late. Thanks for the ideas. I've been having some setbacks writing stories nowadays. Thank you Scott!

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17:08 Oct 20, 2022

Recollection of my experiences a very long time ago, Events that happened over a one month period in various parts of china been compressed for readability, into the 3-day train ride I took to Urumqi with the family that gave me enough food to keep me functioning. A big thank you to everyone who gave editing suggestions.

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Graham Kinross
01:30 Nov 13, 2022

I wonder how much has changed in 27 years. Is all of this true? It’s interesting. People can’t travel so easily now. I met a man once who said he’d gone on holiday to Thailand when he was 20, won a farm in a game of poker and didn’t come back until he was deported years later. Truth is stranger than fiction. Great story.

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Rebecca Miles
19:43 Oct 27, 2022

Hi Scott. Great to transform your own experiences into a piece of creative nonfiction, especially for the likes of me who has never been to China and so can armchair travel via your story! I liked how Gary morphed over the story and how the reader (well at least me!) was taken in by his quasi philosophisings and local know-how. By the end of the story, and the narrator's own experiences, we can see that the best knowledge is not that imparted by a seemingly knowledgeable companion, but that learnt through firsthand encounters. At a time whe...

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