Character Development

Somewhere Familiar

Are you finding it difficult to get to know your fictional characters and/or differentiate them from yourself? Try this: Choose a character from your project and let her/him take a walk into a place you know well. Then describe this place from this character’s perspective and ask yourself:

  1. What does (or doesn’t) s/he notice?
  2. How does s/he feel about what she notices?
    What thoughts do the things s/he notices trigger in her/him? This can be memories, social critique, enjoyment or disgust etc.
  3. How do your character’s impressions of, and responses to, the place differ from yours?


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