21 comments

Drama Crime

If I leave this room, I’m dead. 


At the beginning, when people were getting sick and the restaurants were closing and the schools shut down and people were fighting each other for toilet paper, I didn’t care. I didn’t care because it wasn’t real. I just kept going about my business because there was business to do. See, when everything goes to shit, people want their weed. Then they want other shit; coke, pills, heroin, meth. Desperate times and all that. I’m here for them.


Mom would follow me around the room, waving a spray bottle and paper towels in my face. “You’ll get me sick,” she said “You know I can’t get sick.” She works at night. All day, she’s on me. She comes in the house early in the morning, her scrubs all wrinkled up.


Pointing her finger. You need to get a job. 


Rolling her eyes. When are you going to learn to be responsible?


Hands on her hips. Did you register for classes yet?


That bitch has no idea what I do at night. While she’s at the hospital, I’m sliding into Keyana’s car, riding all the way to the park with the seat down, my head below the window so no one can see. I’m a ninja, trained by an Xbox, shadowing trees and slithering along the little creek that splits this park in half, one side blue, one side red. There’s no in between, but like I said, everybody wants what I’ve got so they always find me. Keyana waits in the dark, even when the cops roll by, lights off. They know her by now. They used to tell her to be careful, now they just nod and go their way. 


Rico is down in the park next to the row of picnic tables where I had my third birthday party, where cold bar-b-ques still smell faintly of family celebrations and rusty staples hold fragments of graduation ribbons, floating in the breeze. He’s a mechanic at a luxury car dealership, left the gang life for the suburbs, a wife and five kids. Fixing rich people’s cars pays the bills, selling them drugs pays for his McMansion, private school. 


I ran into him outside of Taco Bell two months ago. “You sell on the internet?” he’d asked. “I’ve got customers who like to be discreet.” And that was that. I’ve always been good at being invisible. Selling dime bags from my car was never my destiny anyway. Rico needs me, I know tech. I weave my way back through the trees, his words following me. Too much heat. You should lay low.


“Hi baby,” Keyana smiles from the darkness of the car. I love her, I do. We’ve known each other since sophomore year, two quiet nerds always uncomfortable with the high school spotlight. I was a linebacker before I hurt my back, she volunteered in the computer lab. We got together the summer after graduation. Now she comes over at night and stays until it’s time for her shift at the natural foods market. They call her a front line worker. “I’m a hero,” she laughs. She’s gone before dawn.


Mom and me, we live in a back house, one room in someone’s converted garage. They’re home all the time now, kids playing at all hours, parents yelling, music pouring from the windows, the dog barking. Andre, Suzelle, Ivan, Cristal  their mother shouts, Dinner. It’s spring and the weather is nice. Green blades of grass are trying to come up in the dirt, but the kids keep trampling them down.


Mom sleeps on the other side of the curtain, next to the sink and the stove. It never used to be like this when my dad was around, but two words will tell you everything you need to know about him; Indian Casinos. He lives in Vegas now with his new wife and two kids. “Rent is expensive,” mom says, and she leaves it at that. 


We get up at noon. Mom turns on Real Housewives. She says those crazy bitches keep her sane. “The bodies are piling up at the hospital. It’s not safe,” she stares at the TV, then turns to me. “It’s not safe. You have to stay inside.” I surprise her by agreeing. 


“Now that’s a smart choice you just made,” she says. “I know you can make smart choices.”


She says this to a grown man.


“They ordered more refrigerators for the morgue yesterday.” She looks tired. “The people, they can’t breathe, you know. They die alone.” Her eyes fill up with tears. “Promise me. Promise me you’ll stay in.”


The kind of death she’s talking about is peaceful, solitary. I don’t want any kind of death, but I would take that one if I had a choice. 


“I promise, momma.” She goes back to her coffee and her sandwich. Outside, the dryer buzzes. 


If I leave this room I’m dead.  It’s there every time I open my eyes, every time I decide to take a walk to the end of the driveway. I watch the cars slowly rolling by, tinted windows opened just a crack. I wonder if they know where I live. Yeah, mom, I’m good for my promises. At least this one.


Mom buys us bread and cold cuts. Cheese and spaghetti noodles from the dollar store. We eat together in silence, but sometimes the words pour out of her like a muddy river overflowing its banks. 


He was so young, just came home from Disney World.


She cried for her husband. Then she cried because he was on a screen. At least he was there.


He asked for a shot of whiskey before he lost consciousness. 


His brothers played mariachi for him over the phone. He couldn’t hum along but he tried.


I had to order more body bags today.


Summer heat radiates off the roof. We sweat all night, even with the windows open. 


“At least you’re safe,” mom says over and over, like a prayer. Her face is lined with angry red marks from her mask. She touches them absentmindedly.


When she leaves, I smoke. She finds the vapes, thinks it’s tobacco, a bad habit. She worries, she nags. We fight. “The virus attacks your lungs,” she clucks. “You’re setting yourself up to get sick.” I tell her to shut up. I use my size against her, but she’s tough. She never backs down. 


“I didn’t raise you to be disrespectful,” she spits each word out, then she throws the vapes into the trash. It don’t matter. I can always get new ones. 


“Here you go, baby” Keyana hands me a slim pen, we smoke together in the warm back yard under bruised skies with stars that look like needle tracks. “You know Andrea, from the store? She got COVID. Really bad.” 


I nod. “Well, at least you won’t get it from me.” We laugh and laugh. She leaves early, I retreat to my side of the room, computer screen glowing, new orders streaming in. I’m making a fortune in bitcoin, business never slows down. People need me more than ever. In these four walls, I’m the king of an empire built on blockchain. Little bits of data that are gonna make me rich. Lay low a little longer, Rico texts. I’ll get you your share. I’m gonna buy a car first and then a house for mom. We all have dreams. 


In September, the heat explodes into flames that tear down mountains and race across the state, eating up homes, throwing ash into the hot wind. “We’re homeless,” Keyana says, white vapor curling around her face. “Landlord raised the rent. Asshole kicked us out.” Her family is living in a motel off the interstate, with prostitutes and drug addicts for neighbors. “It’s only temporary,” she says. I let her stay as often as she likes. I live closer to the market. 


By December, mom is coughing, deep heaving barks that make her whole body shudder. I open cans of soup and check her temperature. “I can’t stay here,” she whispers. “Can’t get you sick.”


The next day, she gets a test, checks herself into a hotel near the hospital. “It’s COVID,” she rasps over the phone. “Stay home. I’ll be OK. Just don’t leave.” She muffles another cough and mumbles something about sleep. I clean the whole apartment, over and over. I take the trash cans down to the street and come back again, do some laundry, check the laptop. Keyana brings me bags of fast food, we eat in silence under a blanket of dread.


My phone rings. It’s nine in the morning on Christmas Eve. I look at it like it’s alive, afraid to touch it. The fear pours through me from the inside out, like a demon clawing, clawing. I let it ring until a green bubble pops onto the screen, a message. “I’m calling regarding Heather Johnson,” says a disembodied voice. “She’s staying with us. She hasn’t paid.” 


Rico says he’s good for the money, I find it in my PayPal account the next day. I send it to the hotel, enough to get mom through. I haven’t heard from her. The woman from the phone says that she hasn’t left the room, but she’s seen people dropping off groceries. I let her words calm my churning insides. Finally, mom calls. “I’m getting better,” her voice is tinny, tired. “I should be home soon.” I’ve never felt so relieved.


She’s back to work just as the rains come. I warn her to stay dry, not to get too cold. “You can’t get sick,” I remind her, hanging on to threads of hope. She can’t get sick again, can she? She’s always working now, sleeping, working, sleeping working. My worry is so deep, I clean, I pace around the room, walk to the end of the driveway with bags of trash and come back, a constant loop. It’s dark outside at noon. Keyana has stopped coming. “My mom needs the car now that it’s raining,” she explains. “I have to drive her to work.”


Finally the rains let up and the sun comes through the windows. I think about cleaning them. The trees clinging to sandy parkway dirt are blooming pink, edging tired houses and weedy lawns with cotton candy.


The old people living in the front house emerge, blinking in the light. Tengo una cita! says their daughter through the screen. “Vacunas! Manana.”  They drive off to the stadium, where thousands of people wait for the prick of a needle in their arms. They come back bubbling with happiness. 


“Is it over yet?” asks the smallest boy. “No mija,” his mother replies. Not quite yet.”


Their voices bring me out of a deep sleep. I check the clock. It’s noon. I decide to take a walk to the end of the driveway. No one’s going to find me, I’ve been gone a year. I stretch and turn my face to the sun. Birds sing along with the sounds of kids playing. 


A car slides by, then another. You know Rico? The words send a bolt of lightning through me. The car is a blur, windows open. Faces, obscured by masks, circled by hoods. I don’t see the gun, but the sound of shots is deafening.


I twist my body to run back inside, but the kids are behind me, hopping in wobbly boxes written on concrete in pastel chalk, singing, counting. As I turn the other way, heat sears through my stomach. It doesn’t hurt. My leg, my shoulder, the bullets sear through my flesh. I’m on the ground, crawling, grasping for the chain link fence, scooting my body towards the safety of the neighbor’s hedge as pain slams into me. The blood rushes in my ears, mixing with screaming, the thunder of a police helicopter. The dog is barking, barking. I hear my mother’s voice, “Cody! Cody! Please God, no,” She sobs. “Please, he’s just a kid. Please. My baby.”


I’m ok, momma. I'm floating with the helicopters, my words lost in the churning wind. News channel three and sky chopper eight have joined the police now. We hover in the sky like ravens. I see my mother bent over me, her sweatshirt pressed to my body. A dark pool of blood forms on the sidewalk, sirens wail, children cry from the driveway, a scooter lies abandoned on the sidewalk. 


Andre, Andre! screams another mother, gathering her boy in her arms.


I watch as men in blue uniforms load us into ambulances, two gurneys, side by side. One big body and one small. A child's shoe sits on the driveway. Flashing lights burn my eyelids, then darkness. 


The sound of constant beeping scratches the inside of my skull. I open my eyes to a room filled with sunshine, sterile, white. A police officer stands outside my doorway eating take out from a Styrofoam container, chatting easily with a nurse. Mom is asleep in an unforgiving chair, her scrubs wrinkled, her hair greasy. 


“Momma?” My throat burns.


My mother’s eyes fly open and fill with tears. “Yes, baby,” she says, grabbing my hand. Pain. I wince. “You’re ok, the surgery went well. Andre too, he’s ok. He made it.” Her voice is filled with relief edged in anger.


I feel my heart beating, the warmth of my mother’s hand, the prick of a needle in my arm, numbing the pain. I’m not dead, I’m not dead, I'm not dead...I open my mouth and I say it out loud. 


“I’m sorry.” 


March 12, 2021 16:47

You must sign up or log in to submit a comment.

21 comments

Deidra Lovegren
19:45 Mar 13, 2021

Gripping. This begs to be slowed down and written in a much longer form. I cannot believe you packed this entirety into such a short story. Every character is bursting with life. Pure art here —> “under bruised skies with stars that look like needle tracks“

Reply

Julie Ward
22:50 Mar 13, 2021

Thank you Deidra! This story has been knotting itself up in my brain and it took a little while to get it all untangled. I used some of the milestones of the pandemic to move the story forward, so that helped with the flow. I also had to cut and shorten a lot of backstory-I kept wanting to layer it in...so maybe this one is something to tuck away & expand. I'm so glad you stopped by to comment!

Reply

Show 0 replies
Show 1 reply
David G.
03:51 Mar 13, 2021

“we smoke together in the warm back yard under bruised skies with stars that look like needle tracks.” Great line.

Reply

Julie Ward
15:54 Mar 13, 2021

Thank you David!

Reply

Show 0 replies
Show 1 reply
Thom Brodkin
16:27 Mar 21, 2021

You are an absolute genius. This is over the top fantastic. So emotional and raw. I’m amazed at how you can write in so many different styles with so many different voices. Honestly this was both one of my favorites and also so hard to read. It wove the horror of Covid and drugs and dying and killing together in a beautiful yet terrifying tapestry. Great job. Really great job.

Reply

Julie Ward
16:09 Mar 22, 2021

Thank you Thom! I'm so glad you had a minute to read & comment. It's been a brutal year, and I really feel for the teenagers. They're the ones who've gotten kind of lost in the shuffle - in the four walls of their bedrooms, in the glow of a screen day in and day out. They're just kind of expected to cope, keep up with school work, to continue on as if everything is normal. That's what this story came out of...along with some things that have happened around me in real life. It was hard to write, but I felt much better once I got it out on ...

Reply

Show 0 replies
Show 1 reply
A.Dot Ram
00:39 Mar 13, 2021

So good! You have a different voice in this one. I like how it's really the job, not the virus, that's keeping him inside. There are lots of good details that tell the wider pandemic story, as well as the personal story. They meshed together well. We both captured the September fires. It looks like we had the same view.

Reply

Julie Ward
03:09 Mar 13, 2021

We totally had the same view-right down to some of the language we used! I wrote this story for the almost grown up boys - kids I've known since they were little who have gone down some very dark paths in the past year. They've been so heavy on my mind-and their moms too-I had to get them out on the page. Cody is a couple of kids combined into one. Most of the story is based on real events with some news stories about nurses woven in. It's been a brutal year.

Reply

A.Dot Ram
03:59 Mar 13, 2021

I'm sorry there was any grain of reality to that. It felt real, though-- the park that still smells like his third birthday party...

Reply

Julie Ward
16:09 Mar 13, 2021

There has been a lot of trauma for some families I know this year. One of the hardest thing about having children is watching these adorable little people that you lead in Simon Says and serve birthday cake to and watch at soccer games make bad choices as teenagers that just snowball along with them into adulthood. The pandemic has just exacerbated the bad-choice situations in so many ways and the results are devastating. There's also been a huge uptick in violent crime in the neighborhoods all around me. A ten year old boy was shot whil...

Reply

A.Dot Ram
16:52 Mar 13, 2021

Oh, that's right! I remember when everyone was doing all the chalk drawings and window signs. Though in this context my first thought was of the crime scene outlines on the sidewalk.

Reply

Julie Ward
15:30 Mar 14, 2021

Ha! Not a big leap with this one!

Reply

Show 0 replies
Show 1 reply
Show 1 reply
Show 1 reply
Show 1 reply
Show 1 reply
H L Mc Quaid
08:51 Mar 18, 2021

Wow. Very intense and so well-written. You're really good at describing things vividly and succinctly. A lot things I liked. This sentence paints such a vivd image in sound and vision: "A dark pool of blood forms on the sidewalk, sirens wail, children cry from the driveway, a scooter lies abandoned on the sidewalk." One very small thing, was that "sear" was used twice in quick succession: "As I turn the other way, heat sears through my stomach. It doesn’t hurt. My leg, my shoulder, the bullets sear through my flesh." Maybe you wanted t...

Reply

Julie Ward
13:51 Mar 18, 2021

Thank you Heather! And thanks for reading. I'm so glad you liked the story - and I appreciate your eagle eye. I didn't catch that double sear, but I think it does actually heighten the effect. If I expand this one, I'll go back and play around with that bit just to see where the words land.

Reply

Show 0 replies
Show 1 reply
Anne Durrell
15:30 Mar 14, 2021

Julie, You are such a talented writer!!! May I read aloud your story on my youtube or facebook? Of course I will give you credits for the story in the video. I can also leave the link to your website and create 'about the author' in description. I read aloud stories just for hobby. Please let me know. (anne.durrell@starseedfx.com)

Reply

Show 0 replies
Kristin Neubauer
14:21 Mar 14, 2021

This is outstanding work, Julie. I may have said this before, but now I think this is your best story yet. Gripping, yes....that truly is the word for it. There were so many things that got me about this story....amazing writing for one. That's no surprise, but you weave so many lines and phrases into it that bring out such important aspects to the setting, to the characters. The characters - all so strong, so natural in their voices, in their dialogue. But the plot - my God, how did you handle so much complexity in this one story? You ...

Reply

Julie Ward
15:41 Mar 14, 2021

I think what it boils down to is that I care about this character. I want him to be OK. With the anniversary of the pandemic this week, I keep going back to the teenagers, especially the older kids who have lost so much and have gotten so lost in the shuffle. They're grown, their parents are trying to navigate work and other things and they're expected to just keep going and be OK in the face of this enormous, overwhelming loss in their lives. And then they're last in line for the vaccine, for normalcy. I think I just let that grief for th...

Reply

Kristin Neubauer
16:07 Mar 14, 2021

That is all such important insight you’ve raised in your story and your commentary. Sometimes I think about why I write. Liz tells me that she writes to escape from her reality ..... but I think that I write to explore and reflect on different topics and themes that interest me. I feel like that is what you are doing in this story too. I think you should try to publish it somewhere.

Reply

Julie Ward
18:54 Mar 14, 2021

You're right, I am exploring themes that interest me, and this is an exploration of a big looming theme for sure...the loss that has gone along with the pandemic, along with the bigger theme of loss of innocence, the simplicity of childhood, the things that always have been which are no longer-if that makes sense.

Reply

Show 0 replies
Show 1 reply
Show 1 reply
Show 1 reply
K. Antonio
23:27 Mar 13, 2021

The voice in this piece was nuts (in a good way). The way the story starts is impactful and gripping. The use of swears really helped me understand the character and his persona (I thought of him either as an older teen or young adult riding down a path of crime and drugs. The rebel/cool kid, the wise guy, but also maybe even a bit misunderstood. I enjoyed how the story shows us even a different reality, something seen and witnessed (or even known) by very few people. The ending was really heart wrenching and enthralling. I enjoyed how t...

Reply

Julie Ward
01:30 Mar 14, 2021

Wow, K.! Thank you so much! Yes, you totally understand Cody. He's a mix of kids, mostly the guy everyone knows, but no one really notices or understands. He's probably best remembered for the jokes he cracked from the back row of a boring class. There's a lot more to him than meets the eye and he likes it that way. Thank you for taking the time to read and give me feedback - and for your encouragement!

Reply

Show 0 replies
Show 1 reply