18 comments

Inspirational

In all the years I've been around Ethan, I've never seen him like this before. Whether pacing back and forth in a restaurant parking lot, yelling indecipherable words into the beam of a cop's flashlight, doing some crazy dance while strolling down a sidewalk, or swatting at the air inside this liquor store, the one constant about him has always been unpredictability. So now that I think about it, I really shouldn't be too surprised that he's acting perfectly normal this morning. After all, he is unpredictable. 

When I say "perfectly normal", I mean perfectly compared to, say, the last time I encountered him. It's been several months ago, but impossible to forget. I had stopped to get gas on my way home from work. It was getting dark, and I was the only one at the pump. I always get this feeling in that kind of scenario. Like the whole place is a target and I'm the bullseye.

After glancing around myself in every direction several times, my hand squeezing the trigger of the pump like I wished it were a real gun, he materialized. Right within breathing distance of me. Breathing distance, as in: I could smell the cheap vodka. I'm guessing despite the descent into madness over the decades, all that sniper training must still be in his blood along with everything else he regularly puts in it. I don't know what dark corner he'd been lurking in, but my five keen senses had failed me this time.

Of course, when someone is as messed up in the head as Ethan, rumors abound about that person which could be twisted into a full-length horror story. Any time you see him, get back in your car and lock the doors.

Too late to heed that advice on that particular occasion. He was standing right in front of the driver's side door, loaded in the face with his huge, chalky teeth glowing and a set of eyes that matched them.

I couldn't understand him. Nobody can as far as I know. But I understood, at least, what he was trying to do. I accepted the cold handshake while allowing him to use the other to finish fueling the car for me. Then, I dug into my pocket for what change I had as he began wiping the windshield with a handkerchief that had no telling what on it. He was Ethan the Filling Station Attendant that evening, and I was a customer.

Yes. Compared to that evening, or any given time I'd crossed paths with this unfortunate and dangerous soul, he's normal this morning. He's sitting over here in a patch of grass, waiting on Broadmore Discount Spirits to open. Pretty normal for him. But he isn't mumbling or shouting anything, isn't darting back and forth as though the delirium tremens is about to kill him if he can't hurry up and get to the next bottle, and isn't holding the car door open for me with a gracious bow in hopes of an alcohol fund. In fact, if I didn't know any better, my guess would be that he's deep in meditation.

The June sun beats down on his tattered blue jeans. I can see the perspiration bleeding through them. His skinny legs are crossed, his ebony arms reach all the way to his knees, palms turned toward the sky as if awaiting an answer to a deep question. His slumped shoulders are turned away from the building, facing the distant railroad tracks. As the whistle and rumble vibrates the ground, I wonder if he's imagining leaving this self-destructive life behind to go hop onboard.

Should I say anything?

As I gently push the car door closed, I ease toward him. Unpredictable or not, indecipherable or not, the man needs the same acknowledgement and courtesy we all do. He's a Veteran. He deserves respect.

But I pause. His statue stillness must mean he wants to be left alone. I shift my gaze to the sign that reads: "Must be 21 to enter". I'm so glad to be beyond that age now. I lean my head toward my wrist to check my watch. The store will be opening in less than fifteen minutes, and already the adrenaline of anticipation is rising within. When I was finally of legal age, I only came here late in the afternoon on weekends. Now I realize I've been pulling into this parking lot every other day, first thing in the morning. I notice the similarity between the two of us. Same slumped shoulders.

Maybe I'm not so glad.

I know, much like myself, there had to be a time in Ethan's life when things were better. When he could function as well as anyone. Even better. I'll bet he could write a book about his heroic adventures during the war, if only he could think now.

I'll walk up to him. I saw him move. Maybe he's aware of his surroundings.

"Good morning, Ethan."

He flinches. So opposite of the intimidating behavior I'm used to seeing. But then the chalky teeth appear as his lips creep open to reveal them. Breakfast gurgles deep down in my stomach. My stance tightens.

"Hey man, how's it going?" he asks with a calmness so unheard of I find myself looking into his eyes twice to make sure I have the right person.

He points a calloused finger down at the grass and motions me with the other hand. I grit my teeth in secret, shooting glances all around me, hoping no one else is around to label me "crazy" too. He wants me to join him.

As we sit there on the ground, legs crossed like a couple school children about to play "Patty Cake" at recess, my mind revs in search of what to say next. Should I make a remark about the weather? That's always a safe subject. Should I ask about his plans for the day? No. Of course I already know his plans: Same as mine. What, really, do I know about this guy other than that he's a Veteran?

This time, I initiate the handshake. "Thank you for your service, Sir."

He makes a vague choking sound, like my words went down the wrong pipe. "Thanks," he sighs.

I watch him switch his view to the burning sun in the sky. His eyelids flutter, clearly screaming at him to stop, but the sagging frown straightens to a bright smile. He stays focused on it in spite of the tears of irritation shining on his face.

"It was the Fourth of July, 1973. First celebration mama could afford, but she was determined. I'll never forget the smell of the fresh catfish. Best-tasting thing on the Lord's green earth. She could make a breading that would put the best to shame.

I was seventeen. She wanted this to be the best going away present ever, and it was. The whole family was there, the music was...it wasn't just harmonicas and banjos, it was angels in heaven playing. Sisters, brothers, cousins...everybody had a gift for music. And the way they all came together for me that summer, before I was..."

A second sigh. Judging by the weight of it, I venture a guess. "Drafted?" 

That one-word question seems to slam into him like a gust of north wind. He ignores the store's daytime clerk as she greets us by name while unlocking the doors.

Ethan's curly, gray head shakes so hard he's stuttering now.

"I was ordered to snipe innocent civilians."

I spring to my feet, backing away. Not knowing whether to say anything, or do anything but leave and allow him to deal with his thoughts on his own terms.

"They thought it would end the war quicker," he said.

I understand. After all these years, I understand. Ethan has had to live with this for all these years. I'd be messed up too, even worse than I am. They say everyone has their moment in the sun. Ethan's was the summer of '73. That innocent age where life was all about catfish, music, and celebration. 

He pulls himself off the ground, taking a brisk step toward that door. He stops to feel around in his pockets, then turns and looks at me like a lost child looking for directions.

I have no choice but to frown. This stuff is this poor man's only medicine now. Yet I can't give it to him without my own conscience bothering me. What will it turn him into this evening? Ethan the filling station attendant or Ethan the wino lying dead in a gutter somewhere? He's been pushing his luck with this poison daily for too long now.

I pull a five-dollar bill out of my wallet. "I'll give you this if you'll promise me something."

"God bless you," he spouts with relief as he takes it while shaking my hand again. "Anything!"

"Promise me you'll still be with us come July Fourth. I'm going to give you a celebration at my place. There'll be fresh catfish and music. I don't know how to play harmonica, but maybe you can teach me."

He gently lets go of my hand and a sunny expression lights his face.

"Yes, Sir. I would like that."

June 20, 2021 18:51

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18 comments

Francis Daisy
02:07 Aug 09, 2021

Gip, You have phenomenal character descriptions. I feel like I know your characters by their actions and words. You are an amazing writer! "He spouts with relief while shaking my hand!" - I can visualize this so perfectly perfect! How do you do this? -Amy

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Gip Roberts
19:46 Aug 09, 2021

Thank you, Amy. It's mainly you fellow Reedsy writers I credit for improving at my character descriptions. Before I joined Reedsy, I never did very much reading, but now I do and all these awesome stories on here have inspired me a lot. I learn something new from all of them.

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Francis Daisy
02:16 Aug 10, 2021

Gip, I have to agree! This is my new bedtime routine! Log on and read Reedsy stories until I fall asleep! It is a gold mine of stories! :)A

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00:00 Jul 02, 2021

This is a very powerful story about the ravages of PTSD and addiction. The two characters are so well developed, and the narrator is looking in a mirror when he sees Ethan. Addiction is progressive. This story does not judge, but rather explores the power of compassion in a world where many are in deep pain. Well done!

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Gip Roberts
20:04 Jul 02, 2021

Thank you, Victoria. War is a sensitive subject, and when I wrote this, I worried that it might be interpreted the wrong way. So I'm relieved that everyone seems to understand the meaning of the story.

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Toni Leaf Odette
22:49 Jul 01, 2021

The things you think to write are very interesting, such as perspiration "bleeding" through pants or the beginning when standing at the gas station is described as being a bullseye. I always feel that way too. I am a medical person so I enjoyed the smart reference to delirium tremens. Our veterans are a subject not often discussed, though they should be. Great job.

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Gip Roberts
19:54 Jul 02, 2021

Thank you for the encouraging words, Toni. I think all writers have their own unique way with words. I regularly catch myself saying "Why didn't I think of that?" when I read others' stories or books. For the most part, I have a very boring life, so I've learned lots of big words over the years that normally only doctors or other professionals would use. I agree about our veterans, and I hope they will be written about more to bring attention to their struggles and needs.

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Giulia S.
21:43 Jun 30, 2021

I really liked how you described Ethan's character, a little creepy at the beginning and then just turning out to be a person needing help and understanding. It makes me think how people easily jump to conclusions without really know anything. Great work, Gip.

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Gip Roberts
19:53 Jul 01, 2021

Thank you for checking it out, Giulia :) That was exactly the message I was hoping for the story to convey. Thanks for the like and the follow too. I'll be on the lookout for your next story, and I look forward to reading it.

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Giulia S.
21:08 Jul 01, 2021

Thank you! Stay in touch :)

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Susan Reid
20:09 Jun 28, 2021

Great story about a vet trying to help another vet. The fluid story illustrated two different forms of PTSD. Great characters both with consciences.

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Gip Roberts
20:46 Jun 28, 2021

Thank you for the comment, Susan :) Actually when I wrote it, I wasn't giving much thought to who the guy helping Ethan really was; I wanted to portray him as just an average guy helping a veteran, but I wish I had thought of your idea about both of them being vets. That would've really added extra depth to the story.

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Kathy Roberts
20:34 Jun 25, 2021

Great story about a man who most people know very little about. This could be the story of a lot of veterans of war. You did a good job of telling it. We could all have a little more empathy .

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Gip Roberts
20:50 Jun 25, 2021

Thanks for your feedback. I totally agree about the empathy.

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Kendall Defoe
02:23 Jun 24, 2021

I am very intrigued by this one. A very interesting take on the prompt and an interesting look at what war can do to those who serve. Selah...

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Gip Roberts
19:22 Jun 24, 2021

Thank you, K. I got the inspiration for this one from a guy I know of who really is a Veteran. I've often wondered, if he could talk about his life, what he might say to people. Thanks for the feedback.

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Lavender Blue
02:11 Jun 24, 2021

Beautiful story, nicely told.

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Gip Roberts
19:12 Jun 24, 2021

Thank you :)

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