Contest #213 shortlist ⭐️

47 comments

American Fiction Contemporary

“She is definitely a robot,” Carly leans in and whispers in my ear.


I stifle the involuntary laughter rising up my chest by covering my mouth with one hand, swatting her playfully with another. “Oh my god, Carly, shhh!” I press an index finger over my parting lips.


She snickers. “Seriously! There’s no way this chick is real. Look at her,” she’s extending her arm out, palm facing up, gesturing to the woman speaking on stage. “Who looks like that? She seriously hasn’t stopped smiling since she started talking. It doesn’t even look real! That’s definitely part of her programming. And she hasn’t even blinked, like, the whole time she’s been up there! Someone definitely made her. And I don't mean..." Carly is wiggling her eyebrows seductively at me, and circling her hips around in her chair. "I mean, someone straight-up manufactured this woman, then sent her out into the real world to torture us."


I know Carly is joking, despite her attempt to provide validating evidence for her suspicions, but for a small fraction of a second, I entertain the idea. With all the new technology these days, technically, she could be a robot, and it would be pretty hard to tell. Almost as hard as identifying the cake among the decoys in that show, “Is It Cake?” I’m about to take out my phone to text Mark and remind him not to watch the new episode without me, no matter how much Macy begs, but then Carly distracts me.


“Look! She’s not even sweating! It’s like 90 degrees out here!” Carly’s whispering a little louder, pointing a little more obviously.


“Stop!” I manage to say through an escaped laugh. Instead of pushing her arm down, I pull it against my face, using it to muffle what is now uncontrollable laughter. “You’re horrible,” I say when I finally recover.


“Horrible does not make me wrong,” she says, and I can’t argue with that. I can’t even argue with her ridiculous claim. There is definitely something unusual about this woman. It’s been five whole minutes since the principal, Mrs. Averson, has introduced the new PTA board member, who apparently is also the new leader of Henderson Elementary’s parent site council, Sandi Mitchell. Ever since she was given the microphone, she has been talking to, or rather at, us, an apathetic, and frankly exhausted, group of elementary school parents forced to be at our children’s school after hours. Most of us are just relieved to have an hour away from our kids, and, unfortunately, enduring recruital presentations about parent organizations that none of us have the time or energy to join is the price we pay.


But, I have to admit, the more I watch Sandi, the more surreal she seems to be. Everything about her looks like she’s stepped out of a 2000s drama sitcom about a rich, Southern California beach town. It’s as if she modeled her entire wardrobe after Julie Cooper from The OC. She’s wearing all black, in the most elegant fashion, not in my usual “don’t talk to me" kind of way, and over her blouse is a high-end, full-body-length blue and white kimono. Her large brim sunhat sits slanted on her head, creating a halo around her face. Her sunglasses are equally large, daring anyone to question the perfection of her eyebrows. Her lips are a matte red wine color, and gold shimmers from each earlobe. Even from our back row seats (which are only five rows from the stage), I can see her nails are bright, shiney crimson and manicured at a modest length. There's no way she's doing any real house chores with those.


“I mean, where did this woman come from? I heard she’s a lawyer, and she has two kids who go here. How can she possibly have time to run the school, too?” Carly whispers. I scoff so she knows I’m listening, that I agree with her, but now that Carly has joked about her perfection, I'm fixated on her. A lawyer, a mother of two, and she’s leader of every parent organization possible. I can’t help but feel a little guilty, a little insecure, a little envious, even.


“I heard her complaining to another parent about her power being out because they’re getting a car charging station installed,” Carly continues. When I look at her confused, she adds, “Her and her husband are getting matching Rivians delivered next week.”


My jaw drops. Carly’s eyes roll, and she sticks her finger just outside her mouth, pretending to vomit.


“What, did whoever make her forget to install a jetpack?” I say, finally disgusted enough to join Carly’s insults. I instantly feel bad, but Carly loves it; she’s laughing.


“For real,” she says. She crosses her arms tight across her chest. I see her smile fade, shifting into something more serious, something more humane. Something like sadness. “But, seriously, the way she said it, too, like she doesn’t realize who she’s talking to. This is public school. Does she not realize some families are struggling just to get food on their table. She thinks she can complain about a little electricity not working while she’s spending all her millions on some space cars? Ugh, give me a break. Why doesn’t she go find a private school, where she belongs.”


I don’t like putting anyone down, but this I do agree with. The audacity of wealthy people – no, the ignorance of wealthy people – really frustrates me. I think of Mark working overtime last week, and a weight sinks in my chest. More guilt. “Speaking of,” I say, “need anything from Costco this week?”


Carly’s face moves through embarrassment, shame, guilt, gratitude, and relief all in a matter of one second. She lets out a sigh before she says, “Not this week. Kyle’s parents sent us some money. It’ll get us to next week, if we’re careful. Thank goodness the school gives the kids free lunch.”


“Yeah,” I say, then think of the awful hot lunch my daughter Macy described to me on her first day of school. “That’s what Sandi should really spend her money on. Getting these kids some decent lunches.”


Carly is nodding, but her head is cast a little too far down, like she’s thinking about something. I feel another tinge of guilt for saying that, like I’ve just contributed to even more of her own guilt. I know she wishes she had the luxury of telling her kids they got to choose if they wanted homemade lunch or hot lunch from school. I know she would pack lunches for her kids if money weren’t so tight. I know I’m lucky to be able to give Macy a choice, even if I do cringe at the thought of her eating the cafeteria meals.


“Are you sure you guys are doing alright?”


That brings Carly out of her reverie. “Yeah, we’re fine,” she says. She offers me a small smile, just enough to assure me of that fact, and even though I can already see it clearly in her eyes, she says, “Thanks, Mags.”


I squeeze her arm softly. “Anytime.”


The sun had already moved past the roof of the cafeteria when Sandi finally concludes her speech. “So, if you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to reach out to me. I know Mrs. Averson will include my contact information in next week’s newsletter, and like I said, all are welcome at our next PTA meeting on the 18th, so I hope to see you there. I look forward to connecting with each and every one of you. Let’s have a great year, OK? Go Wildcats!”


I’m actually thankful she ends on such a spirited note, or else I would not have known her talk was ending. A weak and unenthusiastic applaud barely rises before it starts to trickle out, and parents all around start standing up and collecting their things.


Carly exhales. “Guess she has to go charge her battery, huh?”


I chuckle. “Your unfailing ability to prolong a joke is my favorite thing about you, Carly.”


“It’s why you love me,” she gleams.


“It is.” I say as I check my chair to make sure I didn’t leave anything behind.


“Is Mark working late again tonight?”


“Uh, no, he made it home in time so I could come here. How about you? Is Kyle home?”


“I wish,” she pouts. “His niece is watching the kids for us.”


“Aw, that’s nice. Hey, I gotta stop by the office and ask Mrs. Greer about my volunteer forms. She hasn’t gotten back to me, and Macy’s teacher asked me to help out next week.”


“OK,” Carly looks at her watch. “I’d go with you, but if I don’t get home soon, Kyle’s niece is going to give the kids way too much ice cream.”


I laugh, and wave her off. “Go, go, go! Save yourself from the sugar crash!”


She’s giggling and walking backwards. “Bye! Good luck, I love you!” She waves before turning and jogging off to her car.


When I get to the office, Mrs. Greer is not there, but there is a sign on her desk that reads “Be Back Soon.” A distant shuffling of papers in the backroom tells me the sign is telling the truth. I lean into the countertop and start twiddling my thumbs, looking around at all the office decorations: Crayola-drawn pictures that say things like, “We love you, Mrs. Greer,” bulletin board calendars, thank-you note cards, and a flyer, reminding parents that picture day is coming up. I gaze over the school’s trophies and the large stuffed leopard displayed in between the center of all the awards, in honor of Henderson’s mascot. For a moment, I feel a sense of genuine pride in my daughter’s school, and nostalgia washes over me. It’s funny how becoming a parent can offer an entirely new perspective on all your childhood memories.


Just then, I hear the jingle of the bell on the office door, and in walks Sandi Mitchell. I startle, reflexively, and then release an embarrassed chuckle. When I face Sandi, I have to actively restrain myself from startling again. She looks even more perfect up close. It is hard to believe any mom of two children looks like this. Maybe Carly was right… Or is there something wrong with me?


“Oh! Oops, didn’t mean to scare you,” Sandi is pressing a hand to her chest, as if she were the one startled, wearing the same full smile she had on during her presentation.


All of a sudden, I feel nervous, like I’m unworthy of being alone in her presence. I laugh nervously, but I feel awkward when I say, “No worries, I mean, I’m sorry.”


If she thinks I’m being strange, she doesn’t show it. Instead, she steps closer and leans against the counter next to me. “Are you Macy’s mom?” she asks.


“Uh, yeah, I am,” I say. An image of Terminator-style analytical vision flashes in my head.


Without missing a beat, Sandi extends a hand. “Sandi Mitchell. Gavin and Marcus’s mom. Nice to meet you.”


I can’t help but stare at the massive diamond protruding off her finger before finally shaking her hand. “Maggie Bolkum. Nice to meet you.”


Sandi nods her head distinctly, like a confident business woman. I guess that’s to be expected of a lawyer.


A lawyer, I repeat in my head, again feeling that tiny sting of insecurity in the pit of my stomach.


“Well, I sure hope to see you at the PTA meeting next month. We could use more parents’ voices. And we could certainly use more mom power,” Sandi winks at me when she says that last bit. Normally, that would make me cringe, like she is patronizing the idea of a being a strong, nonworking mom, but the way she says it felt so genuine, I actually feel a sense of comradery. A connection between two mothers.


I’m nodding my head yes, but I’m speechless, still holding her hand. I see her look down at our clutched hands, and smile before pulling hers back. “Well, it was great to officially meet you, Maggie. I gotta get home and start dinner. You know how it is.” She places a form on the counter, and taps it with her hand. “I’ll just leave that there for Mrs. Greer. If you see her, will you let her know it’s from me?”


“OK,” is all I manage.


Sandi waves and pushes the door behind her, holding her hands on her hat to keep it in place. “Have a lovely evening!”


I’m about to inspect the form she left behind when Mrs. Greer walks back into the office. “Oh, hi,” she says, looking a little surprised. “I thought I heard Sandi.”


I glance towards the door. “Oh, yeah, she just left. She dropped this off.” I hand her the paper, and she takes it.


“Oh, great, thank you.” Mrs. Greer looks it over and sighs, shaking her head. “That poor woman. I just wonder how someone like that can be so generous.”


Instantly, I’m confused. It doesn’t even occur to me to do the polite thing and rein in my curiosity. “I’m sorry, what do you mean?”


Pity fills Mrs. Greer’s eyes, and I’m thankful, for once, for her loose lips. I know she can’t help herself. “She lost a daughter, a few years back. Ivy. She was just a couple years shy of attending here.” The start of tears forming is audible in Mrs. Greer's voice. I’m staring at her, completely stunned, when she mouths the word “cancer.”


Instantly, I feel like I’ve been punched in the chest. Just hearing about a tragedy like that makes any parent temporarily catatonic. A parent’s worse nightmare. I never would have guessed. Never would have been able to tell.


As if Mrs. Greer reads my mind, she whispers, “I think that’s why she keeps herself so busy." Then at normal volume, she tries to relevel the conversation, adding, “Lord knows I don’t know how else she could do all she does.” She huffs, a mixture of laughter and disbelief. “Now, what can I help you with, Mrs. Bolkum?”


I have to physically shake my head to remember what I am here for after that kind of news. Everything else in comparison now feels frivolous. “Oh, uh, yeah. I just wanted to check about my volunteer forms. Am I cleared? Mrs. Jenkins asked me to come in next week.”


“Oh, sure, let me check on that,” Mrs. Greer wanders to her desk and starts tapping away at her computer. “Looks like you’re all good. Fingerprints went through yesterday, so you’re cleared to volunteer next week.”


I hear her, but my mind is miles away, swirling in a dark place. Imagining a little girl who might look like Sandi. Considering what kind of sci-fi-like surgeries it would take to put me back together if anything ever happened to Macy. What bits and pieces of metal and hardware would ever even come close to mending a heartbreak like that. Mrs. Greer has no idea how deep she’s sent me, but I manage to look up, and say, “OK, great, thank you.”


Mrs. Greer nods politely and settles into her desk. I take a few steps to the door. I’m about to push it open, but I pause. “Actually,” I say. Mrs. Greer looks up. “Can I have a PTA form?”


“Sure. You thinking of joining?” She stands up and grabs a sheet of paper from a stack on her desk.


I take the form and pretend to start reading it. “Uh, yeah. Maybe. I don’t know. Thanks. Goodnight, Mrs. Greer.”


As I’m walking to my car, I call Mark. It only rings twice before Macy answers. “Mom! You have to get home right now or Dad and I are watching 'Is It Cake?' without you!”


I laugh. “Don’t you dare! I’m leaving your school right now. I’ll be home soon.”


“Hurrrrrrryyy!” She groans.


“I love you,” I say before she can hang up.


I hear a shouted “Love you!” before the phone disconnects.


When I get to the car, I place the PTA form on the empty passenger’s seat. I don’t know if I’ll actually join. Maybe if I can convince Carly to join. The thought of her makes me take my phone out again. I type “AI robots” into the search bar.


The amount of information about new AI technology that pops up is immense. It also looks complicated and insanely terrifying. I remind myself to revisit this rabbit hole with Mark later. He’ll be more willing to read all the articles about it and summarize them for me.


I put my seatbelt on, and start the car. I watch Macy’s school get smaller in the rearview mirror and remind myself I’ll be back here in less than twelve hours. My brain instinctively starts packing Macy's lunch for tomorrow. On any other night, I'd probably prolong the space between now and tomorrow morning's school drop-off by taking the back roads home, giving myself a few extra minutes of solitude and the freedom to choose whatever music I want to hear. But as I sit at the stop sign, looking left to the long way home, and right to the quickest route, a thought crosses my mind that gives me both an aching pain and a surge of warm gratitude.


I think of Carly, first, and then Sandi. I think of the missing space she must feel between her arms every time she hugs her boys.


I’m one of the lucky ones, I think.


And then I turn right.

August 31, 2023 20:19

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47 comments

Anna E. Walters
17:32 Sep 09, 2023

Congratulations! Your story flows beautifully, your dialogue is authentic, and the insertion of backstory is seamless. I was expecting it to go in a different direction, but loved the twist and the heartfelt ending. Thanks for a wonderful story!

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AnneMarie Miles
18:27 Sep 09, 2023

Thanks so much Anna for reading and commenting. I'm glad it came off as authentic. I had a lot of inspiration from a real life back to school night 😂 appreciate your time. I'll cruise over to your stories soon!

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13:03 Sep 09, 2023

I enjoyed the twist to this story. At first I felt it was going on to be a mean moms plot like something out of Little Fires Everywhere, but them it moved into a completely dfferent direction. I can imagine some people who are trying to show a very positive exterior may be in a situation like Sandis. Congrats on making the shortlist this week!

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AnneMarie Miles
14:08 Sep 09, 2023

Thanks, Scott! Glad it wasn't too predictable. I've been thinking a lot about how easy it is to judge someone. We never know the whole story, and I try to remember that. I appreciate you taking the time to read and comment!

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Delbert Griffith
08:54 Sep 09, 2023

Congrats on the shortlist, my friend. Wonderful tale, with a smack at the end. I loved this story. Cheers!

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AnneMarie Miles
14:08 Sep 09, 2023

Thanks so much, Delbert! Sure was a pleasant surprise :)

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Ken Cartisano
02:33 Nov 23, 2023

A very realistic and enjoyable read.

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AnneMarie Miles
23:09 Nov 24, 2023

Thanks, Ken! Inspired by a real school-parent meeting!

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Mary Ann Ford
22:19 Oct 03, 2023

Even though I do not have kids this is so sad. What a beautiful story AnneMarie. BEAUTIFUL!!!!

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AnneMarie Miles
22:34 Oct 03, 2023

Thanks so much Mary Ann. I write about being a mom a lot but I hope there are universal messages for everyone in my stories. Thanks for reading!

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Amanda Lieser
23:52 Sep 20, 2023

Hi AnneMarie! Oh my darling, how excited I am to see you back writing! And this piece is such a great example of why. I absolutely adored each and everyone of these characters, as well as the ethical implications that you put into this piece. Perhaps we will never understand each of our own journeys, and we will never truly know the battles that each of us fight on a day-to-day basis. We have all spent countless hours staring down another human being with wrath in our hearts. However, I thought that you did an exceptional job of humanizing a...

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AnneMarie Miles
15:47 Sep 21, 2023

Hey Amanda! Thanks for the kind words :) it feels good to be back here and writing stories again. Took a little time away to write some poetry. I wasn't expecting this story to be so poignant, but it played out that way and I'm happy it did. I find there can be so much judgement between groups, often born of our own insecurities, and I think it's important to remind ourselves we don't know the whole story. Thanks for reading! Your latest story was a gem, happy to be ready your writing again!

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Story Time
17:07 Sep 14, 2023

I think incorporating backstory is so tricky, and you did a great job. Plus, I didn't see the story going in a more poignant direction, and I thought you handled that well. Congratulations.

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AnneMarie Miles
18:47 Sep 14, 2023

Thanks so much, Kevin!

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Philip Ebuluofor
09:14 Sep 11, 2023

Fine work. Not a surprise to see your face again. Congrats.

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AnneMarie Miles
12:41 Sep 11, 2023

Thank you Philip!

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Mary Bendickson
01:17 Sep 10, 2023

Congrats on shortlist. This was truly great.🥳

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AnneMarie Miles
02:07 Sep 10, 2023

Thank you so much!

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Audrey Knox
22:24 Sep 09, 2023

This story started off so light and fun that I had no idea I was going to be so moved by it at the end. A really nice exploration about how we can be so quick to judge without never really knowing the full story. I laughed at the "Is it cake?" observation/slight digression at the beginning, and I like that you pulled it back into the story at the end for a nice payoff that highlighted the transformation of the narrator's perspective. My only note, structurally, is that I feel like in the middle I lost a sense of causality in the plot. I wa...

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AnneMarie Miles
14:41 Sep 10, 2023

Hey Audrey! Thanks for taking the time to read and comment. I appreciate your thorough feedback, and I'm glad you were moved by the ending. I've been working on inserting depth into mundane moments in life. As for the middle section, it is great to hear this critique. I thought the purpose of Maggie's visit to the office had been clear - this part is inspired by my experience having to track down the office manager at my daughter's school to get my volunteer forms cleared, lol. But it sounds like it wasn't significant enough for the reader, ...

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Tom Skye
08:04 Sep 08, 2023

Did this have a real-time weekly reedsy cross reference in it ? Is saw "Is it cake?" in another story :) This a really great read with good detail. The "don't judge a book by its cover" theme shone through, but the characters were brilliantly drawn with a good balance of detail and mystery to them. Really enjoyed it. Amazing job

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AnneMarie Miles
12:52 Sep 08, 2023

Hey Tom! There is a story called "Is It Cake?"! I was happy that someone else shared that idea. It is a great response for this prop and it's an even greater show! Thanks so much for taking the time and commenting. I really appreciate it. I'm off to read more of your work now. PS - Cora from your Apple Heist story is an absolutely fabulous name. I should know, I named my daughter Cora :)

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Rebecca Miles
18:33 Sep 07, 2023

Finally made it back to Reedsy, sister Scribbler, (it's been quite a week back at the chalkface!) What a voyage of discovery Maggie goes on; it just shows that the biggest things we can learn about ourselves and others might be right in front of our noses, in humdrum places like boring meetings, driving the car home. The story felt well structured: nice section at the beginning where the reader can still sense Mags struggling against the mere straighforward snarky scathingness of Carly and then the middle section which forces her reappraisal...

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Rebecca Miles
15:50 Sep 08, 2023

Back with a double bang 🎊🎊🎊🎊

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AnneMarie Miles
02:38 Sep 09, 2023

Aw, thank you, my dearest! I have been thinking about you and your other contest submissions, I hope it was a successful writing week for you! I have no doubt that you are going to absolutely stun the judges!! I cannot wait to hear how it goes. As for my little story ... can you tell my daughter just started kindergarten? 🤪😂 I didn't have very many ideas for these prompts so I had to borrow some inspiration from real-time experience and twist it a bit, glad it worked out into something worthy of a shortlist! Certainly wasn't expecting that ...

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Rebecca Miles
06:16 Sep 09, 2023

Mine those rich seams of personal experience!!! I hope she's settled in ok and it's not too big an upheaval for you. I set myself the target to submit to a different competition; I'm really happy with the concept I've come up with ( it's a historical piece based on a real protest in Cambridge where they burnt an effigy of a student in protest at a vote to grant women degrees: not a great day for women's liberation!) But it's way too big, 10000 words and one scene still to write, so I'm going to finish, edit and query agents. It will probably...

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AnneMarie Miles
14:16 Sep 09, 2023

Historical pieces seem to be your bread and butter, so I have no doubts that agents will be eager to buy this one from you! Absolutely do not let it just sit on your computer!! You are too talented for that. I always find myself humbled and honored when I read your elegant writing. Share it with the world, sister! As luck would have it, just about every audiobook, movie, and novel I've read recently has someone been about monsters...I suppose I am surrounded by inspiration for this weeks prompts, just got to capture and execute sometime bet...

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Betha Darling
21:04 Sep 04, 2023

I loved reading this story! It was so descriptive and the imagery was amazing. I felt like I was at the school meeting. I was really interested in Sandi's character and wanted to know more about her. I appreciated how the story showed us that there is often more to people than meets the eye and that we should try not to judge others based solely on appearances. Amazing job!

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AnneMarie Miles
02:05 Sep 05, 2023

Thank you so much, Betha! There is far too much judgement in the world, and I think this becomes more apparent in the parenting world (no pun intended, ha!). I appreciate you taking the time to read and comment.

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Betha Darling
18:17 Sep 08, 2023

Congratulations on your story being chosen and shortlisted! :)

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AnneMarie Miles
18:34 Sep 08, 2023

Betha, you are so kind to return here and congratulate me. Thank you! I was rooting hard for The Naked Driver, but don't get discouraged. You have great talent and the judges will see it.

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Betha Darling
04:19 Sep 11, 2023

Thank you! :)

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Michał Przywara
19:29 Sep 04, 2023

Great to see another story from you! And such a simple premise as a parents' meeting at a school is *loaded* with details. True to the prompt, there's a lot here about images, about what things appear to be, and it's mostly centred around Sandi. From robot to clueless rich to grieving mother barely holding it together. None of them are quite right though, are they? Learning about the loss of her daughter, Maggie realizes how wrong her initial assessments of Sandi were. She pictures what such a loss would do to her, and it nearly wrecks her...

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AnneMarie Miles
02:10 Sep 06, 2023

It's great to be back here on Reedsy, but even greater to read another lovely comment from you! Thank you for taking the time, friend! "We don't have enough information to make a judgement" is precisely the takeaway I wanted readers to get from this. I find myself constantly considering what people's lives are like, making up little tidbits here and there to help me empathize or better understand them, especially when I feel that natural instinct to place judgement on them. Perhaps most writers do this, heh. I think it's important to rememb...

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Michał Przywara
22:03 Sep 06, 2023

Yeah, I think you're right on with the empathy! It seems like a critical skill for writing characters, especially if they're in some way repulsive. How can you make a reader care about a murderer, if you don't explore the why of it? Or if not that, if not likeable, it helps to make characters more believable. The other point too, about the instinct to judge, is a good one. I find leaping to conclusions is often harmful in real life, but it's a great way to generate some drama and friction in stories. Well, like in this one. It's why we get ...

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Michał Przywara
22:29 Sep 08, 2023

Woo! Glad this piece got some recognition :) And a great way to return to the contest after a break :)

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AnneMarie Miles
23:15 Sep 08, 2023

I certainly wasn't expecting that coming back! Pleasant surprise indeed :)

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Marty B
05:45 Sep 04, 2023

Maggie was blinded by the bling, the perfect nails, perfect hair. But it is an act, a successful act, by Sandi to protect herself from the loss of a child. We all put on an act, it could be a stressed out 'too busy' act, or a 'I just want to fit in' act. We can connect with other people when we let down the act and be show our fears and vulnerabilities. This is a great story emphasizing that point- we all judge less and listen more. A typo- 'parent cite council' -site

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AnneMarie Miles
15:00 Sep 04, 2023

Hey Marty! Thanks for pointing out the typo. It doesn't matter how many times I comb through this, objective eyes are invaluable. I was able to fix it before approval 👍 And thanks for taking the time to read and comment. I agree. We are always trying to portray something that we think will help us fit in, but really we'd be much better off just being authentic and genuine.

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Delbert Griffith
13:46 Sep 02, 2023

Wow, AnneMarie, you nailed this prompt in masterly fashion. The big reveal at the end is stunning, literally, and the observations about the "perfect woman" hits all the harder when we find out that the woman has lost a child. And, yes, it is a parent's worst nightmare. It's so good to see a tale coming from your ultra-talented pen once more, my friend. As per, it's an amazing piece of work. Sublime would be a good way to describe it, for all its grittiness. Nicely done. Cheers!

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AnneMarie Miles
15:13 Sep 02, 2023

You are so kind, Delbert. Thank you for reading and the compliments. It is good to be writing again, and I'm glad you enjoyed. I've just come from your latest story and am still smiling at the thought of it, imagining the ear-fulls Reginald might offer to the staff and PTA members of Henderson Elementary...

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Kelsey H
08:36 Sep 01, 2023

I love how many aspects of motherhood/parenting you touch on in this piece such as the jealousy, guilt, financial pressure, the pressure of school obligations, as well as the positives of friendship and humour and community. I really enjoyed the way the plot unfolded with the information about Sandi being revealed, and how it puts the view of her as being robotic in a new light for the narrator.

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AnneMarie Miles
13:22 Sep 01, 2023

Hey Kelsey, thanks for reading and the wonderful comment. Parenting is complex, and it seems it becomes even more so when elementary school starts! I'm glad those facets came through, and that Sandi's reveal worked. Wasn't sure if it was too sudden. Thanks again for your time and words.

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Sophia Gavasheli
22:46 Aug 31, 2023

Hey, Anne Marie! It's so good to see you active on Reedsy again! You set up this seemingly mundane scene very well; I could totally imagine myself listening to a woman drone on about the PTA. So the reveal about Sandi was quite sudden, as it was for Maggie, and really gets you thinking about how much you have compared to others. Don't judge someone by the way they look, eh? I really liked the robot imagery as well; grief can kind of turn you into an emotionless machine. Also, you showed instead of told Carly and Maggie's friendship superbl...

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AnneMarie Miles
02:54 Sep 01, 2023

Hey Sophia, thank you! It feels good to be back. I've definitely missed this place. Took some time off for school/work, and focused a bit more on poetry for a bit. But thank you for checking in on me, by the way. And thanks for being the first to read this new story. Glad the robot imagery worked well for grief, and that the message came across well. Whenever I find myself making assumptions about people, I try to remember I don't know their whole story. This was my ode to that reminder. I hope to continue on here, too. Fall is usually a ...

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Sophia Gavasheli
03:56 Sep 01, 2023

Yeah, sometimes it's good to take a break from writing. Heh, I'm looking forward to my next story too 😁. If only it would write itself...

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20:55 Sep 06, 2023

https://exampledomain.com/?u=XXXXX&o=YYYYY please come in I beg you

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