Dialogue

Use Your Words

​Voice separates MEH stories from the ones that grab attention. ​Voice is the unique way ​a writer combines words and strings together sentences. It is ​a story’s personality, its manner of expression. ​A compelling voice is the difference between “Oh, shucks!” and “Oh, slippery slush!” (Little Red Gliding Hood)​. Between “Charmaine’s showing off” and “Charmaine’s strutting hard enough to shame a rooster” (The Quickest Kid in Clarksville). And between “Pancake ​escaped​” and “Pancake rappelled down a rope of linguini” (Lady Pancake and Sir French Toast)​. ​Examine your story for common language — for example, circle blah verbs and insert something more unique.


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