Character Development

The Truth Shall Set Your Characters Free

In order to dive deeper into your character’s emotional depths, ask a round of questions — both probing and seemingly innocuous alike. (Hey, you never know when your character’s favorite choice of ice cream topping might come in handy!) While we encourage you to build and refine your own set of questions, these questionnaires will provide solid inspiration for now: Arthur Aron’s 36 Questions That Lead to Love, and The Proust Questionnaire.


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