Contest #154 shortlist ⭐️

38 comments

Drama Fiction Mystery

The raised bands and gold leaf of the worn spines, stood to attention in rows of mismatched heights and colours, on antique, wooden shelving. Coloured headbands, only visible if you peered over the spines, protected ancient text blocks, bound by dextrous hands generations ago. Delicate pages concealed within, played host to a plethora of type-set prints, pen and ink lettering, and hand painted illuminations. Every wall, floor to ceiling, in the L-shaped shop, displayed its share of literary beauty.


Bethan breathed in the beloved leather and dust as she turned the faded sign from “closed” to “open” in the central bullseye-glass panel of the door.


This had all seemed like such a good idea five years ago. She had signed the lease and filled the shelves with her grandfather’s collections, bringing a life-long obsession to reality. She’d used all of her contacts to obtain further stock and get her name out to connoisseurs all over the southeast and beyond. The first three years saw a regular in-person client base developing and online sales picking up. People travelled to see her, to see her rare books, to see her charming shop.


Though clients could now pay by card or with their phones, the original walnut sales desk still stood proud on the blue, floral, Victorian tiles. The drawers at the back were filled with items Bethan had collected or been given. Bone folders, Japanese tissue paper, binding glue, craft knives, waxed thread, curved needles, the tools of restoration and reparation that went hand in hand with her love of ancient tomes.


If covid and lockdown had not hit, business would be booming. But right now, people were still scared to come out, and the rise in the cost of living had taken its toll on disposable income, even for those with the wealth to collect. How long could she manage before closing up, clearing out, and handing back the fancy, brass keys?


The handmade chocolate maker to her right and the luxury pen shop to her left had already done just that. Only eight of the twenty-two exclusive, Victorian arcade units were still in business. Footfall was not picking up.


Bethan pushed the depressing thoughts away and sat behind the cash desk to sip her vanilla latte. She glanced over at her desk calendar – Olde English Word of the Day.


Yesterday’s word was still showing: wæferlic – Theatrical. She recalled, with a smile, the previous day, when she had worked the word into her head by being overly dramatic about everything. Swooning as she answered the phone, feigning tears when she dropped her pencil, laughing rather too loudly at Mrs. Benson’s awful literary jokes. A sense of humour was really all that kept her going.


As she reached across to tear off yesterday’s word, the bell above the door tinkled and a young woman with a thick woollen coat came in, damp haired and uncomfortable.


“Can I help you?”


“Oh, hello. Yes, I think you can. More than you know.”


“Intriguing! Do come in.” Bethan stood and approached the lady with a quizzical smile.


“Are you Bethan Aldershot?”


“I am, the very same.”


“I’ve been given your name about six times now by different people and finally decided it was worth the journey. I did try to look up your number, but I really do hate talking on the phone.”


“Well, it’s lovely to meet you. Is it a particular book you’re looking for?”


“Actually, I’m hoping to sell. It’s a bit of a strange story, and no one else in the trade seems to have time to hear it. They roll their eyes once I get past the first line or so and they realise they can’t open it either. I’ve tried libraries, museums, dealers; no one will take it off my hands.” The woman removed her gloves and stuffed them into her overflowing handbag before she stopped to look around the shop. “What a beautiful place! Little dusty perhaps.” She ran a critical finger along the edge of the nearest shelf.


“Thank you?” Bethan pulled her spare chair from behind the counter and gestured to the woman to take a seat.


“I’m Caroline, Caroline Moseby,” said the woman, sitting down and propping her various shopping bags against the corner of the cash desk. “My father left me a book I cannot open, and I fail to see its value if I can’t even look at the pages.” Caroline felt around in a carrier bag and, after some rummaging, pulled out another carrier bag with a book inside. She handed the bundle to Bethan.


Bethan extracted the volume from the bag, unwrapped the pale tissue paper from around it and set it square on the desk, taking her seat as she did so. It was a brown, three quarter, calf skin binding, with probably vellum pages. It looked ancient. The spine was cracking and the leather was damaged in many places, lifting slightly from the board on the bottom edge. The whole thing was held shut by a leather strap with a metal clasp that looked like it should swing open easily with a bit of encouragement but might be further damaged in the process. The stitching of the clasp to the strap was frayed and delicate. A single word appeared in faded gold leaf along the spine: andgiet.


“Well, this is unusual. I’ll put some gloves on.” Bethan rummaged in her top drawer.


“It’s been in my family for hundreds of years, passed down and down until everyone forgot what it was,” Caroline said. “The only information I keep hearing is that the word on the spine means –"


“Knowledge,” Bethan said. “It’s Anglo-Saxon, or Olde English for knowledge, or possibly understanding or perception.”


“Yes, exactly that.” Caroline sat back and started to relax into her chair. “I’m so glad you are who they say you are. I was so worried I’d come all this way for nothing.”


“Well, I’m a student of Olde English, still building my vocab. In my line of work it can only help. Why would you want to sell it?” Bethan put her white cotton gloves on and lifted the book off the desk.


“No one can open it, so no one can read it, so I fail to see why anyone should keep it.”


“What do you mean no one can open it?”


“This is where I always lose people. I fully expect you to give up about now.” Caroline took a deep breath. “The clasp looks like it should just turn and open, but it doesn’t. Everyone has tried everything and if they are not too scared to break it they are too heavy handed and they damage the cover. The British Library offered to take it off my hands as a donation, but I can’t part with it for free. The truth is that my husband and I have fallen on hard times since all this covid business. Our family company folded last year, and we've been living on savings, but they will only take us so far. We have children to think of and the job I managed to get is only part time.”


“I understand,” Bethan said, “I really do. It’s been so hard on small businesses."


“Well, I’m sure if anyone could get the thing open they could get it verified and valued. I honestly think it’s a genuine Anglo-Saxon text and worth considerable money, but no one can examine it properly, so no one can tell. My Great Grandfather swore blind when I was a child that it was worth a fortune, but he also said it was only worth a fortune to the Worths. You see, my family name is Worth. I was never sure what he meant by that.”


“It’s fascinating.” Beth ran a gentle finger over the clasp without attempting to open it; this was going to take patience. “Where have you travelled from? It sounds like you don’t live nearby.”


“Down from Harrogate, actually. Though I lack the local twang. My husband, you see, Yorkshire born and bred. We moved up there when my mother died. I’m staying at the White Gate guest house for a couple of days, hoping to get this sorted once and for all.”


“Would you be happy to leave it with me for a few days? I could see if I can open it, and if I can, I can try to work out what it is. You’ll probably want to get several valuations before you sell. But I’d certainly be interested in it if it’s genuine.” Bethan opened her bottom drawer and pulled out a small green book. “I’ll give you a receipt of course, proof that I’m holding it for you.”


Caroline agreed, and left the book behind as she ventured back out into the mizzle, shopping bags bumping off her legs.


Bethan turned the shop sign round again and pulled the blind down behind the glass panelled door. She flicked on the banker’s lamp on the cash desk and extracted a magnifying glass from the second drawer down. Examining the strap and clasp on the book revealed nothing new. The stitching was frayed and the clasp fragile. She could see no reason it wouldn’t open.


Gloves still on, she turned the book so that the spine was facing her, and examined it again – it did appear genuinely ancient. Even breath might damage it, so she found a surgical mask in her desk and covered her mouth and nose. Covid preparations did have some practical use outside of the pandemic.


After a few minutes, Bethan got up the courage to try the clasp. A gentle poke with a single finger achieved nothing. It wouldn’t move. She tried holding it gently between two fingers, nothing. She tried carefully tugging at the strap, shimmying it towards the top of the book, then towards the bottom. Though the strap did not seem tightly fitted, it would not budge.


Bethan managed to lift the front cover away from the text block by a few millimetres with the strap in place, but it wasn’t enough to be able to examine the pages, or even the end paper.


In the interests of avoiding getting frustrated and heavy handed, Bethan stood up, took a large cigar box from the shelf behind her, wrapped the book back up in its tissue papers and stowed it in the box. She agreed with herself that she would close the shop, take it out and try a different tack every two hours, resting and calming herself between attempts. If the British Library couldn’t open it, then it was quite possible she couldn’t either. There was no point getting worked up.


Once the shop was open again, Bethan turned her attention back to her desk calendar. She carefully tore “wæferlic – Theatrical” away from the block and filed it under T in the hanging folders next to the desk. It made way for today’s word - blawan – meaning to breathe or blow. This was one she had heard before but needed to learn the different tenses. Now to spend the next six hours blowing on things to fully commit this word to memory in all of its forms. She blew on her fingernails and on her cold coffee first, while repeating the forms of the verb. What else could she blow on?


Two hours and one customer passed. It was time to try Caroline’s book again, so Bethan shut up shop. Once it was lying back on the desktop in front of her, she tried again to jimmy the clasp with her gloved fingers. Nothing.


Silent conjugation of the verb blawan helped her concentration. Blawe, I blow. Blaewst, you blow. Blaewp, he blows. Blawp, they blow. Bethan removed her surgical mask, wiped her lips with a tissue and blew the gentlest of breaths across the clasp of Caroline’s book.


“I must be crazy.” She sat back in her chair, rubbing her eyes.


There was a short, but definite, metallic scraping sound and Bethan opened her eyes and studied the book again. The curved pin of the clasp had pulled back from the buckle and released the strap!


Mask back on, Bethan leaned over the book and examined the clasp with the magnifying glass. It was definitely open. She removed the strap from around the binding and laid it out on the desk.


Supporting the delicate spine with the fingers of her left hand, she began to open the front cover, a few millimetres at a time. The front hinge of the book seemed to be intact, and after a minute or so, the cover was open and the dark green end paper exposed to the air.


Bethan’s first thought was to call Caroline, but she hadn’t left a number, and had said she hated talking on the phone anyway. Perhaps she should just keep going and see how far she could get before Caroline came back.


She found her small blue notebook and a pencil and wrote down her observations as she worked. After a few minutes, the inner end paper was turned to rest on the inside of the front cover, and the title page was visible. Or what would have been a title page in a more recent book. The top of the page was mostly filled with an elaborate monogram in red and green. Black ink cris-crossed the lettering in curved, diamond patterns. It appeared almost Celtic in design and was snugly fitted between two black and red borders, one on either side. Below the monogram, exquisitely hand-penned in black ink on the vellum, was a short paragraph of Olde English text, ready to be examined.


Bethan stayed at the shop long into the night. She pencilled her notes into her pad and didn’t stop until she had finished the full translation.


***


At 9am the following day, Caroline arrived to see if the mystery of her book had been solved. The door was open and she let herself in, tinkling the bell.


Her first step into the shop was interrupted by a large, red book, lying face down, pages spread open on the floor, spine cracked. There was another book next to it in an equally unkempt manner, and another, and another. The floor was littered with damaged books. The books still on the shelves were falling on top of each other in untidy piles, bindings ripped, spines broken, pages torn out.


“Bethan! Bethan! Have you been burgled? Have you still got my heirloom?”


Caroline stepped between book after book until she came level with the cash desk and peered behind it. There was Bethan, collapsed on the floor, white gloved hands clutching Caroline’s book. Caroline’s open book!


Bethan’s face was vacant, eyes glassy, mouth open, pale, unmoving. There was a blue notebook next to her on the floor, a pencil pressed between the pages.


Caroline knelt down beside her new acquaintance, tapped her on the shoulder and tried to rouse her, but she didn’t react. She started to clear books out of the way so she could get in closer, picking them up, closing their covers and arranging them in neat piles on the floor. The strange thing was that all of the pages of the books were now blank. Completely blank.


Caroline wrestled her own book from Bethan’s stiff fingers and peered into it. The pages were full of hand-written text and brilliant illuminations in bold, bright colours with detail that took Caroline’s breath away. She looked around for the strap that had been over the cover and soon found it on the edge of the desk. Now it was open once, it must surely be easy to open again, so she wrapped it back around her book and fastened the clasp to keep it safe before stashing the book away into one of her bags.


She tried again to rouse Bethan, and established that she was breathing, but could get no response. She picked up the notebook from the floor and glanced inside – there were handwritten lines, some in Olde English and some in modern day words. She put that into her bag as well. Then left the shop without summoning any help.


***


Helen, the dressmaker from three units down, passed by the bookshop at around 11 and noticed the shop in disarray. She called 999. Bethan was taken to hospital and regained consciousness two days later with no recollection of what had happened or of who she was. She knew nothing of antiquarian books or Olde English. She couldn't remember her own family.


***


Caroline got on the train home and opened the little blue notebook to the centre pages with a lot of pencil scribble on them.


You opened this book at risk to your soul,

Seeking within it the knowledge it stole,

If you be Worthy you need have no fear,

The contents inside, to your mind, will be clear.

If you be not of the family Worth,

Now you will find in your knowledge a dearth,

No ink on your papers, no paint in your frame,

No memories, insight or facts in your brain,

All that you knew shall reside in this book,

Taken straight from you as soon as you look.


Caroline fished the book out of her bag and laid it on the fold-down table in front of her.


All that knowledge could be the answer to her problems. Bethan was quite the scholar, and the contents of all of those books! She could open her own bookstore. Become a history professor. Who knows what other knowledge was contained within? She could do almost anything.


She tried to open the clasp, but it would not shift.

July 10, 2022 20:46

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38 comments

Jon Casper
17:30 Jul 11, 2022

Katharine: The visual and sensory descriptions are really amazing in this piece. Bethan's character is a joy, especially the way she undertakes learning her Olde English word-of-the-day. The intrigue of the strange, old tome is brilliantly done. I was dying to know what secrets the book held. I enjoyed how you revealed Bethan's tragic mishap through Caroline's point of view. The poem at the end was a nice touch. The only plot point I couldn't get my head around was the destruction of her other old books. It's not clear what happened there o...

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17:40 Jul 11, 2022

Thanks Jon! That's great feedback. I wasn't sure about this one. Does it need another dimension? Do I need to make Caroline a nasty piece of work so that it's better at the end when she can't open the book after all? Maybe she arrives to find Bethan in trouble but ignores her to try to reclaim the book? I'm not sure, but something to make us dislike her a bit. You are correct about the ink missing from the other books. Caroline's book has stolen all of the knowledge in the room, only left bethans notebook because she wrote in it in pencil,...

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Jon Casper
18:44 Jul 11, 2022

Ooh, I like the idea of making Caroline a baddie. I wonder also about whether Bethan could have some fatal flaw that contributes to her being absorbed by the old book, and more than an unfortunate victim (although sometimes, s**t just happens, right?). I did miss the pencil vs. ink distinction, but I love it now that you've explained it. If there's any way to draw a little more attention to that it might be helpful. Such a cool premise. Looking forward to the next iteration.

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05:36 Jul 12, 2022

Hi Jon, I've done a bit of an edit. Any thoughts gratefully received.

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Jon Casper
10:46 Jul 12, 2022

Hi. The story is working very well now, with the additional reveals into Caroline's character. Again, I find Bethan's character to be quite charming, with her habit of committing the word-of-the-day. Your economical and vivid prose is always a pleasure to read. For line edits (if you were looking for those now), I mainly noticed comma issues, and have detailed those below. //If covid and lockdown had not hit, [then] business would be booming. - Consider removing "then" here. Seems implicit. //“Oh[,] hello[.] [Y]es, I think you can. More t...

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20:35 Jul 12, 2022

Brilliant! Thank you Jon as always - I still fail to learn the punctuation and you save me every time. Your other suggestions are also excellent. I stuck the whole thing in the Hemmingway editor after I made your changes (and a few more of my own) and apparently I am at 2999 words! So, while I agree with you about the amnesia scene, I am not in a position to rectify it :( I'm tempted to sneak in one final word to make the count bang on 3000 LOL. Maybe I will do that now.

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23:46 Aug 03, 2022

Oh my Gosh, you have to write on! This was fantastic... I lived through every detail! Beautifully written!

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06:50 Aug 04, 2022

Thank you for reading, I'm so glad you liked it. The idea might support a longer piece but I'm unlikely to write a sequel. I feel like Reedsy stories are better when they stand alone. Thank you for your kind comments 🙂

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Amanda Lieser
19:31 Aug 02, 2022

Wow Katharine! What a well deserved short list. I really love how you built the mystery for this piece. I was also dying for a sequel as I read more. This felt like something straight out of Hollywood. I’d love to hear your thoughts on how you got inspired for this piece. Nice job!

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20:39 Aug 02, 2022

Hi Amanda, thank you so much for reading and taking the time to comment. I'm so glad you liked it. As for inspiration, it has been pointed out to me recently by a fellow Reedsy author and friend, that I write a lot about boxes of various types. So for this story I was determined not to write about a box. I am an ex-librarian and I have done a bit of book binding in my time, so I turned to what I know. I wanted the book to be valuable somehow but also unobtainable - there had to be a reason that the character wanted to get rid of it, but al...

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Kevin Broccoli
16:21 Jul 28, 2022

I really enjoyed the inclusion of the poem and I thought you brought the story to a close at just the right moment. Well done.

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19:00 Jul 28, 2022

Thank you Kevin. I couldn't have closed it any later as it was at 2999 words 😂 I'm glad the poem worked for you, I'm not sure everyone liked it. Thank you for your kind words.

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Marie White
01:41 Jul 27, 2022

This was a really intriguing story. I loved all of the descriptions, and the ending was perfect.

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06:40 Jul 27, 2022

Thank you very much for reading and for your comment. I'm glad you liked the ending.

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Jon Casper
09:55 Jul 23, 2022

Congratulations on the well-deserved shortlisting! I admire your ability to hone your stories into such polished treasures. I am very hopeful that your next story will also do well. You have an original style and voice, and I'm so pleased that you're getting more and more recognition for it. It is always an inspiration.

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09:57 Jul 23, 2022

Thank you Jon, that's really very kind.

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K.J. Dyer
20:01 Jul 22, 2022

Really enjoyed this story. It was beautifully illustrated in my mind. I have been to Hogwarts and can see the shop of books there next to Gringot’s bank.

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21:26 Jul 22, 2022

Thank you so much for your kind comments.

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Charlotte Morse
07:43 Jul 22, 2022

Wow! An awesome story, well done! I loved everything about it! The descriptions, the content, the poem, the ending and especially the book itself! Caroline replacing the clasp - I was so willing her not to, having that nasty feeling that it wouldn't re-open! Excellent piece of work. Thanks for sharing

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11:10 Jul 22, 2022

Thank you Charlotte, that's very kind. I'm so glad you liked it.

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Connie Kinsey
02:26 Jul 22, 2022

Katharine, it is well past my bedtime and it was my intention to give your story a brief read-through and come back to it tomorrow. (I've had a day!) However, I got sucked into story. I enjoyed it. The description is detailed and touches all the senses except for smell which seems a pity given the lovely aroma of old books. The story line that she is hanging by a thread due to COVID has me wondering how she expected to buy the book. Caroline seems to be a piece of work. I am instantly wondering why she took care to stack the books,...

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21:29 Jul 22, 2022

Hi! Thank you so much for your well considered comments. I'm so flattered that you stayed up to read! I will reply properly tomorrow or Sunday. But didn't want to leave you with no response until then as you have been so kind. Thank you!

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21:15 Jul 24, 2022

Hi again Connie, this weekend turned out to be busier than expected and I am writing this on my phone while lying in bed. Thank you again for your time and consideration. I agree that I don't make the scent of the books pull it's weight, there is only one line dedicated to it and it's weak. Where Bethan breathes in the dust and leather. I too thought about how she would pay for the book and, in my head, decided that she would sell it on, on Caroline's behalf, and take a cut, using her contacts. But I couldn't make it fit in the word count ...

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Ba Eubank
01:59 Jul 19, 2022

Wonderful story. You put the reader right there. Great ending also.

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06:43 Jul 19, 2022

Thank you for reading and for your kind comments. I'm really glad you enjoyed it 🙂

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Cole Hiller
19:08 Jul 18, 2022

Wow, that was an incredible premise! I thoroughly enjoyed this story for a variety of reasons. At first, when you brought up covid, and that it was set in present day, that was a bit discouraging, but I soon got over that and was sucked into the incredible plot. I really liked your use of Olde English, it was very different and creative, along that and your setting, it was very charming. Another thing I noticed was your vocabulary. You had a pretty diverse vocabulary, straying away from common words. The poem at the end was well written, it...

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19:16 Jul 18, 2022

Thank you so much for reading and for your detailed comments. I'm so glad you liked it. Do you mind if I ask why the mention of covid was off putting? I'd be interested to know because in my head I can't really write about anything set in the last couple of years without a nod to reality. I'm glad you liked the twist, and the unpleasantness of Caroline's character. The original draft was weaker without them I think. Thank you again.

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Cole Hiller
19:40 Jul 18, 2022

It wasn't necessarily covid that was off putting. For whatever reason I tend to like things that aren't so explicitly contemporary more. I don't know why, maybe it's an escape from reality or something. With books like Keepers of Lost City, I still enjoy because even though its technically contemporary earth, it isn't necessarily explicitly say that. Or books like Lord of the Rings, which don't even take place on earth. I tend not like to realistic fiction, you could write about anything instead of reality. It's honestly probably more of an ...

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19:52 Jul 18, 2022

Thank you for getting back to me. It's really interesting to hear. I do understand the idea that you prefer stories to be an escape. I've already read and commented on your story. I hope it's helpful 🙂

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Cole Hiller
19:57 Jul 18, 2022

Thank you for doing that, it was helpful!

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Xiomatli Diaz
04:45 Jul 18, 2022

A wonderful piece! It's always so beautiful to read about the love of books. Quite whimsical and what a tragedy to not remember her life! Absolutely brilliant.

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05:14 Jul 18, 2022

Thank you very much for reading and for the kind comments. I'm glad you enjoyed it.

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Alex Sultan
09:59 Jul 15, 2022

Hey friend - I'm sorry I'm late with this comment. Very busy week. I do hope it is not too late. I read through the story twice and enjoyed it both times. I really liked how you built up the mystery of the book(not a box this time😅) and it kept me very intrigued to see what you'd do with it. Added, Bethan was a fun character to follow. Great use of a foreign language, too. Here is what I have for notes: The raised bands and gold leaf of the worn [spines,] stood to attention in rows of mismatched heights and colours, on antique, wooden shelv...

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19:18 Jul 17, 2022

Hi Alex, no problem, you were a little late for me to edit for the contest but I still appreciate the comments - always good to learn from you. I have posted for this week just now, it's something of a dark comedy, which isn't my usual style but I thought I'd give it a go. If you have time to crit I would be grateful. Are you writing this week? The theme is very British! Is "Swings and roundabouts" a phrase you have come across before?

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Alex Sultan
03:49 Jul 21, 2022

For sure - I would be glad to read it. I've not heard the phrase before! Does sound very British. For me, I'm taking a break from Reedsy, and am going to try my hand at a novel(Something like 'Grace of a Goddess' but in much longer form) I'll probably only write here if the prompts really inspire me. Will make efforts to keep reading tho.

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05:10 Jul 21, 2022

Hi Alex, thanks for stopping by. The novel sounds exciting 🙂 I'll miss you posting on here though. Best of luck!

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Alex Sultan
02:46 Jul 23, 2022

congratulations, friend - I'm always happy to see your work do well 🥳 I'm looking forward to when you take first place !

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05:00 Jul 23, 2022

Thank you Alex, that's so kind. I'm so excited that this got shortlisted. My writing has honestly improved because of you, I'm very grateful.

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