The Drawing Room

Submitted into Contest #131 in response to: Set your story in a drawing room.... view prompt

27 comments

LGBTQ+ Teens & Young Adult Romance

She looks like the lady from the Klimt painting. No, not that painting. The one with the fan. Sooty bay curls caressing rose petal cheeks, imperious brows that rise and fall on the tides of conversation. Her eyes are so like rootbeer I wanna stick a straw in them and take a sip. And that mouth. It's at the upturned corners, where I know a million secrets linger, that I want to kiss.

She's the most beautiful girl I've ever seen, and I might even tell her so if her boyfriend would shove off for half a second.

We're in room 264 of the Classical Building, Miss March's classroom. She's hung the mother of “dad joke” signs on the door, “The Drawing Room”, and there are gummy bears on the peeling tin ceiling. No one knows when or why, but they've been slowly submitting to gravity for at least the four years I've been here. One of my portfolio paintings – a weird, surrealist gummy bear landscape – was inspired by them. And Rhode Island School of Design liked it enough to send me the “thick” envelope, so I guess thanks, gummy bears.

“I don't really get it,” Cami – her name is Cami – admits, tying her coils up into a messy bun. Her voice is like one of those ribbons gymnasts dance around with.

“That might be the problem,” Miss March says. “Try not to intellectualize it. It's about feeling – a liberation from form and structure. We're not trying to make today, we're trying to unmake.”

“That's stupid,” her boyfriend mutters to a subdued chorus of sniggers. Cami elbows him sharply in the ribs.

But honestly, he's not wrong. Like... why, Miss March? You're gonna dive right into Russian Suprematism? On day one of intro art? I'm sure when she got that MFA she probably hoped for more, well, “me's” in the classroom. And there are a few. But mostly what she got was a bunch of mouth-breathing gummy bear slingers looking to fill their humanities requirement with crappy doodles on 20lb 98 bright copy paper. I do feel for her – all that enthusiastic idealism wasted on the “Cami's boyfriends” of the world. But seriously. Why?

“Layla, what do you think?” Miss March asks.

“Ummmmm,” My tongue sticks to the roof of my mouth. I'm not sure why she's calling on me – I'm not even in the class. She's been letting me use the studio space during my free period for the last two years, but I did not consent to my input being required as tender. “Well, ummmm, for me, I guess, it's... artistic escapism.”

“Good. What else?”

Kasimir Malevich, the father of Suprematism, said he was “trying desperately to free art from the dead weight of the real world”. Which is what I should maybe have said. But art has always been my preferred form of expression, so I shrug and let that blowhard Tate Mason take the floor. And boy does he. With what's left of the hour, the class watches Miss March fumble the projector and occasionally manage a few unfocused slides on the dingy off-white walls. And I watch Cami until the bell rings.

“What did you mean by that?”

Cami, long-limbed and lovely, stands over my table. I can see her goosebumpy kneecaps through the tears in her jeans.

“By what?” I ask. My tongue is glued to the roof of my mouth again.

“The escapism thing. What did you mean?”

“Oh. Well,” I look up at the gummy bears. “Like even abstract art is an abstraction of something, right?”

“I guess?”

“The 'real' world doesn't exist in Suprematist art. Or at least it doesn't matter. The art kind of defines the reality instead of the other way around.”

Those sharp shoulders kiss her ears as she raises them, laughing and tilting her head. “I guess I still don't get it. See you tomorrow.”

“See you tomorrow.”

***

As the bell rings, Cami floats to the back of the room and slides into the seat next to me. The smell of gardenia wafts off her, engaging the stench of oil paints in an olfactory duel. Her dress skims over her hip points and puddles on the chipboard stool.

“Hi,” she says.

“Hi.” And before my tongue can stick to that comfortable hollow in the roof of my mouth, “Where's your boyfriend?”

Not my boyfriend,” she frowns. “And he dropped the class.”

The art I make today is in layered shades of California poppy and Indian Paintbrush. Like her dress. Translucent, intersecting trapezoids straining against the angled lines that spear them like art kebabs. All the weight of an impossible, imagined reality I want to shed but also don't want to shed. It's a non-objective feeling, for sure, but it's not an escape. I feel her rootbeer eyes wandering to my work.

“You're like, really into art, right?” she asks.

And you, I want to say. But all my “prettiest girl in the world”, all my yesterday's internal blustering, blows off like a withered storm.

“Can I see?” she asks, pulling my sketchboard across the table. My cheeks ignite.

“We match!” she holds my painting up alongside her dress. “I like it. Mine is crap.”

“Total crap,” I agree.

Her face riffs through an octave of emotions before holding at amusement, and eventually, raucous laughter. She has dimples.

“Cami,” Miss March drops her glasses and raises her brows.

“Sorry,” she says.

“Total crap,” I whisper again as she kicks me under the table.

***

“So is this your thing, then? The Suprematism?” she taps on my canvas, where a milky square drifts toward the bottom right corner of a field of gesso.

“Ha. No.”

“Okay, then what?”

I think. It's easy to define my art for someone who has the right vocabulary. Neo-fauvistic surreal portraiture, I'd told my interviewer at Rhode Island School of Design. She'd nodded knowingly and jotted notes in the margin of my application. I chewed all the skin off my fingertips as she riffled through my portfolio, pausing at the gummy bear landscape.

“Ummm... lots of bright, non-representational colors. Figurative – so like, not abstract. Some weird surrealism – but not ugly surrealism. Like pretty surreal. Mostly portraits. People.”

“Yeah, I got like none of that,” she laughs. Her laugh is so easy. It's her ease, I think, that absolutely shatters me.

I want her to understand.

I need her to understand.

“I could show you,” I say. “Miss March leaves the drawing room open an extra hour after school on Thursdays. I keep a lot of my stuff in the classroom,” I nod in the direction of the cubbies, where my battered black vinyl portfolio lives.

“Cool,” she says, “Tomorrow then.”

***

The drawing room is cold. Miss March always cranks the windows open on Thursdays to air out the “pernicious fumes”, she calls them. I pull my hands up into my sleeves to keep them warm, but mostly to keep from gnawing all the skin around my fingernails clean off.

Cami steps through the door, and this time, it's that Klimt painting she recalls. The longing part of my mind coerces a fantasy – her, me, enrobed in flowers and gold. She softens into the quiet ardor of my embrace. Her head warm in my paint-smudged palm, her hair tangled in my fingers. Her effervescent rootbeer eyes are closed – mine are too. Not in ecstasy, but in the relief of a sustained longing – a lifetime of unspoken desires – come finally to fruition.

“Hey,” she drops her bag and lowers herself onto the chipboard stool. “Let's see what you got.”

She leafs through the canvases and panels. My guts clench so hard I feel like I'm being turned inside out.

“I like this one,” she says, pausing at 'Girl with Cornflower Eyes'. Our elbows and forearms touch. I imagine her leaning into it. No, she is leaning into it.

“It's my favorite,” I say. “'Girl with Cornflower Eyes'.”

“She looks really happy,” Cami says. The secret-speaking corners of her mouth are upturned.

She is really happy. I am really happy. I'd captured me mid-jump, chin high. A smile with all the teeth showing. A hurricane of marigold hair casts lavender shadows across my face and two frilled cornflowers bloom in my eye sockets. I painted it the day I got the thick envelope. “Yeah. I just wanted to capture – I was trying to –”

“I get it,” Cami whispers. Our hands meet. Linger.

“Maybe I could do one of you. 'Girl with Rootbeer Eyes'.”

She braids her fingers into mine. “I would really like that.”

I soften into her and close my eyes, not in ecstasy, but in relief. Finally. Finally.

February 04, 2022 18:02

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27 comments

17:24 Feb 10, 2022

I meant to say this earlier, but your power of description is gorgeous. I felt as though I were watching the story play out before my eyes 😊 beautifully done! 👏

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Deidra Lovegren
22:37 Mar 26, 2022

A tour de force. My favorite one of your stories! You are brilliant at this. Loved it all - start to finish!

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Anna Nonymous
17:01 Mar 28, 2022

Well shoot, Deidra. High praise coming from you. Had such a blast on the podcast and am looking forward to our PNW road trip lol

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Deidra Lovegren
17:42 Mar 28, 2022

I love the end where we are cracking up. We finish each other's sandwiches. (Let it go, I know.)

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Deidra Lovegren
18:59 Mar 28, 2022

I was only half kidding on the PNW roadtrip. Let's pick up Shea West and keep going. No one will miss us.

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Phil Manders
12:42 Feb 10, 2022

Hi Hannah. I’ve got to tell you this story really impressed me. Not only with its content but in the way it is written. I can’t fault it. Great job well done.

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Anna Nonymous
15:35 Feb 10, 2022

Thanks so much for taking the time to read and for your kind words! I'm so glad you enjoyed this.

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Stevie B
00:54 Feb 10, 2022

Hannah, you're killing me here with your reader to writer interaction, and beautiful similes and metaphors: "She looks like the lady from the Klimt painting. No, not that painting. The one with the fan. Sooty bay curls caressing rose petal cheeks, imperious brows that rise and fall on the tides of conversation. Her eyes are so like rootbeer I wanna stick a straw in them and take a sip. And that mouth. It's at the upturned corners, where I know a million secrets linger, that I want to kiss." And what a wonderful way to die, my friend...

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Anna Nonymous
01:32 Feb 10, 2022

Thanks so much for your kind words, Stevie! Your feedback is so appreciated, and so, so valued. I kind of fell in love with these characters and was sad to wrap up this story. I'm thinking that maybe means I need to dedicate more words to them?

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Stevie B
03:14 Feb 10, 2022

Yes, if that's how you feel you certainly need to expand this into a larger work and let it take you where it goes. Give yourself to your work and your work will work wonders with your vision. You unquestionably have the vision and already purchased the ticket by writing this tale. So now take the ride by writing what it shows you. Easy-peasy-lemon-squeezy...

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Boutat Driss
17:44 Feb 08, 2022

Great style well done

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Anna Nonymous
18:43 Feb 08, 2022

Thanks so much for taking the time to read, Boutat!

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10:08 Feb 06, 2022

Great Hanna, such an expressive, colourful opening paragraph I was smiling straight up and settled back for what proved to be a beautifully crafted ode to art and the interesting characters who populate its sometimes obscure domains. The M.C. is a delight and a whirlwind of humour, observation and emotion. Loved too many snippets to log here but here's a few, 'her eyes are so like root beer I want to stick a straw in them and take a sip'. 'But what she mostly got was a bunch of mouth breathing, gummy bear slingers looking to fill their human...

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Anna Nonymous
16:32 Feb 06, 2022

Thanks so much for your kind words, Scoop. The gummy bears are REAL and exist(ed) in a large, underfunded public school somewhere in New England. I had a lot of really talented artist friends, was something of an art nerd myself, and this is an ode to them.

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Cindy Strube
07:25 Feb 06, 2022

Hannah, I don’t think I would have read this story if I weren’t already familiar with your writing style (just because the genre isn’t my thing). I went back and read through it again, to enjoy your glorious descriptions of color. So fitting for the “Drawing room” setting. “A hurricane of marigold hair casts lavender shadows across my face and two frilled cornflowers bloom in my eye sockets.” And the one already referenced: California poppies, Indian paintbrush, art kebabs. You have made a painting with words!

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Anna Nonymous
15:24 Feb 06, 2022

Thanks so much, Cindy! It's not my usual genre either (although my first stab at this prompt, which I ultimately abandoned, was also curiously very teen/young adult), but if you can believe it, this came to me in a dream. I know, I know. But I'm so glad you enjoyed it, and appreciate you taking a chance reading off-genre!

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Cindy Strube
17:05 Feb 06, 2022

I can indeed believe it - I have a story (not a short, more a novella) - that was very much inspired by a dream. The main character is not the sort usually found wandering my dreams! (But I suppose the characters we create while awake are made from daydreams.)

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K. Antonio
14:43 Feb 05, 2022

I loved how the first paragraph read, how it sounded and rolled if read out loud. I enjoyed the narration of this, how the narrator posed questions and how the story takes place in an art classroom in the beginning. I loved this snippet: "The art I make today is in layered shades of California poppy and Indian Paintbrush. Like her dress. Translucent, intersecting trapezoids straining against the angled lines that spear them like art kebabs." As someone who was the art nerd (your MC reminded me a bit of myself) I liked the descriptions an...

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Anna Nonymous
20:40 Feb 05, 2022

Thanks so much for your feedback, K! I'm so glad you liked the first paragraph - I went back and forth on it a lot, just generally concerned whether this would be interpreted as a realistic voice for a high school kid. I decidedly ultimately that if high school me could talk and think like that, MC could too! I relate a lot with her too, only most of my love was utterly unrequited. Felt good to give her a happier ending than I ever experienced in high school!

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Ann Martin
05:40 Feb 05, 2022

You grabbed me in the first line because Klimt is my favourite artist. Hope that doesn't give the impression that I'm an expert on the subject, because I'm definitely in the 'I know what I like" category. But you DO know art and your story just exudes your passion for your subject, as well as igniting passion in your readers. I love this story. I love your highly original similies and metaphors; a voice like the ribbons that gymnasts dance around with! Brilliant! Your ending; the longed for love at last, is so tender and satisfying. Thank y...

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Anna Nonymous
06:16 Feb 05, 2022

Awww, Anne! Thank you so much for this incredibly kind comment. I always worry that my writing will be too "intellectual" or alienate readers who don't have the context or, as Layla might say, "vocabulary" to enjoy it. Glad it found its audience in you! But I hope people who don't love Klimt as much as us will feel compelled to at least google the images, because they're worth it! Thank you so much for taking time to read, and congrats again on shortlist. LOVED Lytton Blood!

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Elle Boyd
16:24 Mar 15, 2022

I know I'm late to this, but your writing is just so lyrical I had to "voice" my appreciation. Beautiful story. Love the rootbeer eyes. I was disappointed when it ended - I kept scrolling, hoping for more. Wonderful job!

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Anna Nonymous
16:59 Mar 28, 2022

I'm late too, apparently! Thank you so, so much for your kind words Elle. I've actually (in my head) written a pretty extensive future for these two. If the prompt gods ever allow it, I hope to follow up with them.

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15:59 Mar 10, 2022

Loved this story.

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Anna Nonymous
16:59 Mar 28, 2022

Thank you so much for your kind words!

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A B
17:27 Feb 18, 2022

Beautifully done!! Loved it I kind of want to know more please keep making more!!

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22:21 Feb 11, 2022

A great story and an excellent tribute to art and the artist. You have an incredible way of weaving a tapestry of beautiful images.

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