The Words Change

Submitted into Contest #206 in response to: Write about someone facing their greatest fear.... view prompt

23 comments

Fiction Speculative Suspense

“The words change,” she’d whisper to me at night in our bedroom, winter sleet against the windowpane. “They shift," she’d say, her eyes runny, terrorized, hidden in shadow.

I didn’t know what she meant.

My wife would come down to breakfast, not eat, just pick at her eggs, red-orange yolks. The kitchen air would crackle, an electrical charge in her presence. The smell of burnt wire. Her nails were chewed to the hub; tattered band-aids wrapped her fingers, blood seeped through. She'd left her senses by then; her face waxy, white, glistening. But her last words rising from her near catatonic state? “They change. The words change.” She would laugh, a naked grimace.

After she died, there was nothing the embalmer could do, or the mortician, who left the mortuary, mortified. They tried, but they closed her up. None of us could meet the other’s eyes, denying the haunting, the unexplained twists and deformities in the white, bloodless flesh.

The funeral fell on a wretched day; frozen, a hoar frost. The priest spoke of metaphors living after death. Gathered graveside was an umbrella line of somber black, a yellow backhoe standing by, idling, blue diesel in the winter gray. I chipped the first shovel of iced earth and the casket knocked hollow as the dirt fell on the carved oak top, an empty sound. We overlooked the thudding from within, a sure hallucination. But I knew my wife was in there. I remembered her face permanently affixed in a deranged scream.

As I left the funeral, a wall of curtained arctic storm blew through, a snow squall, thumb sized hail, oddly, thrashing the windshield, wiper blades smearing the glass. An unreasonable weather event.

With the services behind me, I went through my wife's places; cleaned out the closets, her clothes draped on hangers, her lavender face soap; her jewelry box on the top shelf, the pearl necklace from our thirtieth wedding anniversary; her makeup, rouge. And I knew she had a journal, but she never let me read it. And then I found her iPad, tucked in her desk, a hidden drawer, garlic occulted, coming loose when my thumb found a lever. It lifted, clicked. So I started reading, just as you are now.

You’re reading on your iPad, e-reader; at your desk at home, the place you sip coffee, tea, maybe write, reaching for the muse in your mind, inspiration, something that comes from outside your very self. Or maybe you’re reading off your phone as you commute on a train. Unaware of events around you. Or maybe you’re at work, your cubby, on your computer when you should be working. Your world is safe and unchanged.

So where's this headed? The prose infects. Not just a computer virus attached to the file, but something more, something new. As a virus, my words will bleed into yours, yours for the next reader, the next reader bleeding on others. But in some new decrepit way, horror. A horror virus, with a twist.

Not my horror. Yours. So now you are reading, scanning, skimming the words, assessing, all on your electronic media. But soon the text on one of your readings will blur, just a little, you’ll hardly notice. Something you’re reading will go off kilter. I didn’t notice at all, only on reflection did I think there must have been a changing.

You will try to disregard the media. And then you will choose to pass this virus on, if you can call it a virus, to other people, friends, loved ones. But preferably to other people you don’t care too much about. It's a transmitted disease.

So, why would this be a problem? I can hear you asking this question. It’s just a Reedsy Prompt. You’ve run across this posting in the #206: Phobias. But what you don’t know is I squirreled it in, placed it like an insidious land mine in the list. And now you’re thinking, hasn't this been done before, a virus that spreads?

But what if the words change as you’re reading? A new modernized twist. What if some evil presence (twenty-something sickoids) played with the AI and the prose re-writes the words on your electronic media just for you? On the fly, based on reading your inner most thoughts, your inner most hidden fears. What if the malicious intent of whatever this is molds the words, the sentences, the subject, theme, plot, and nails it, staking you to the ground, delivering you to the grips of your greatest fear? And then the fear engorges you, feasts on your vulnerability. What if what you're reading can find you?

But you know thoughts are things. The synapse connections make electrical impulses. Scientists measure these impulses. We all know this. But if your thoughts are measured, examined for weakness, pried out of your head like a wireless call, then can’t something we don’t really understand read your thoughts? And after this channeling, can’t this inventory of your emotions, your thoughts, form a customized pattern of words, a written prose, and send it back to crawl up the base of your spine in the form of what's written on your computer?

You scoff; I hear you. But what if you’re wrong in your dismissal? Can you sense I am begging you to believe this is more? Do you really think you know there is no bitter intent from some source, some governmental agency mucking about? Sure, I know. It’s a story, you’re thinking, not even that well written, no winner certainly. Nothing more. But isn’t there the tinniest percentage likelihood it’s more; the infinitesimal chance that you will meet the horror of your imaginings, and a fear so great you will not come back? I mean, not come back, as in looking in the mirror at 3:12 AM tomorrow morning, and the person you see has a face shredded, tightly twisted skin beyond repair, dissolved in terror. We don’t know everything. This is possible.

Everyone has a greatest fear. We know this. And all of us have read passages where our skin crawled, something in our brain chilled, we shuddered. Sometimes this was so nerve twitching, so unsettling, we set the book aside. We took a break from maybe Edgar Allan Poe. We set aside our Stephen King, our Silence of the Lambs, our fava beans with dry merlot. Others. Maybe we took a shot of scotch to shake it off.

Greatest fear? What a trite phrase. What I mean is real fear. Fear where you lose yourself in white static, roaring in your brain, taking over, a losing of who you are. Not losing your memory. I don’t mean that. I mean recognizing it’s yourself, but something’s missing. Your soul has left, and the replacement is horror, a terrified shell of who you were staring back in your mirror. Combined with a searing pain in the entirety of your body. This is beyond grinning and bearing. A pain you can’t come back from. A pain where you gobble OxyContin like M&M’s. A pain you would sell your soul to stop. But your soul is already gone. Stolen.

So what’s your greatest fear? What would cause the screaming white static in your brain to take over?

There. Right there. You took a peek in your mind, didn’t you? Just a crack, but you looked in. You had a thought. I saw you do it. A synapse sent a message.

Oh, maybe it’s water? You fear you will die a watery death, desperately holding your last breath, flailing your arms to the surface, kicking in leadened leather boots as carbon dioxide builds, burning into your lungs as you hold, hold, hold more. Your lungs are searing, begging release of CO2. Then, with the shimmering surface in sight, you gasp your last breath, icy saltwater passes your throat, sucks into your lungs, rushing. Your eyes go dead. You drift, then settle down in a cold green seaweed muck, your hair drifting, an Ophelian weightlessness as you descend into the waiting black.

Is it water? No, it’s not water, is it?

No, not water. But you took another peek, didn’t you? Your fear, the one you don’t really tell other people, the one you're hiding from me now, flashed in your mind. It was just for a second, but it was there, wasn’t it? And then you dismissed it. I won’t go there, you thought. But you will. You really will.

Is it death on an airliner? It starts with a bump, a little turbulence. The nerdy suit next to you says not to worry. Statistics. Greater chance of death on the drive to the airport, he says. This doesn’t help. Then another series of bumps shudders through the cabin. Your knuckles go white grabbing the arm rest. And then the jet hits a gorge in the sky. A ditch. Baggage tumbles out of the overheads. The jet banks hard, pitches to the right, oxygen masks tumble down, a serving cart careens down the aisle. And then you don’t hear your own scream as the jet angles straight down. But you are screaming. You are. The suit next to you stares into space, starts crying, then pukes yellow globules weightless in the air, covering your left sleeve, the side of your face. You press your eyes closed. Tears stream off your face sideways. And you are alone, and you have time to wonder if you’ll feel the awful heat from the jet fuel engorging your body, the pain ripping.

Not an airliner? But you took another look inside yourself, didn’t you? What did you see? Feel? You dismissed it again, didn’t you? This is just a story, words on your screen, a dumb Reedsy prompt, you tell yourself. The words don’t have a consciousness, a reading of your thinking. A truly sick evil intent. An awareness. 

A horror recipe written just for you. I know you think it’s unlikely the words will change, just for you. Impossible. But what if you’re wrong and the fear you think about creeps onto the page of what you’re reading, re-writing the zeros and ones? The journal reads your synapse thoughts perfectly, fine tunes, and infects whatever you read on your electronic media, and spits back to you a prose that takes you to a place where you are reading about your own personal worst horror, and nails it. The media manipulates you emotionally, sadistically; you become a terrorized puppet on a string.

And what is your worst horror? Your synapse connections just sparked, didn’t they? The journal noticed. It listened deep within the media. And the prose will change on what you’ll be reading. Just for you. Sucking you in. You won’t be able to stop.

For my wife, her terror lay in her grave, her casket. She feared being buried alive. Pleaded with me before her death, in the kitchen, her knees on the blue patterned linoleum, her arms gripping my legs. “Promise me you’ll cremate me,” she wailed. “Promise!”

“Of course,” I said. “I’ll honor your last wishes.” She died peacefully, welcomed it. Something about family legacies, though. People like a place where they can visit their loved ones, talk to them, ask the advice of the dead. Her family had a plot with at least ten graves, her mother, great grandmother from the 1880s, a whole gang. The plot has a Victorian wrought-iron fence around it, black, and people admired the fence. “Who’s buried here?” they’d ask. “Who puts out the plastic flowers?” So I really had no control over the burial procedures, her family being matriarchal. And for no reason anyone could explain, somehow her catatonic demeanor twisted up after she died at the mortuary. Rigor mortis, I guess. Her legs and torso bound up on themselves, but in her case, her face also did some binding. Lying in the mortuary, on the slab, somehow her face muscles contorted into the distinct appearance of a scream; an Edvard Munch painting, her mouth expanded impossibly open, her skin stretched, her eyes protruded, her white skin clammy, wet. Can you be in terror after you die? I used to think not, we’re dead after all. The mortician agreed, but he couldn’t change my wife’s face.  

If you’re not willing to forward this, I know what happens. I know this because I chose not to forward it. For a while. Until now, that is. I posted it on Reedsy and that’s why you’re reading it now. I’m convinced there is something evil entwined in the words, spreading to whatever you read. Maybe artificial intelligence, and for all I know, a living intelligence.

My worst fear came to me reading my wife's iPad. A burning rush; wolves chasing me down, snapping, biting, ripping the tendons in my heels, bleeding strips of flesh, crippling me on the ice. It’s a sunless day on a snowfield, a horizon of pine forest beyond, like Siberia. The pack of six, it’s always six, circle me slowly, growling, lips snarling, their eyes red, a red almost black. This was my worst fear. I presume my wife’s iPad spelled it out in a twisting prose after reading my thoughts. I know this sounds unbalanced as I write this. Please forgive me. But the wolves were only in my dreams until I found them in the iPad. But the words. The words in the iPad entwined in my head perfectly. A prose where every word, comma, conjunction, eclipses, and simile, raised a terror in my heart, unfathomable. The other wolves backed off at the end. The largest wolf, the leader, sniffed at my throat, smelled of dead carrion, had heated breath, moist, then licked my carotid artery with his purple tongue. You know what comes next. The wolves became all I could think about. I couldn't sleep. I began biting my nails. I went back again and again to the iPad, compelled. I slept with my wife’s iPad while whimpering into the night.

I realized there was one way, and only one way to prevent this. There was never an ethical question considered. I needed to destroy the journal, delete it, burn the iPad, my computer, my phone, get rid of them all. I tried. I promise you I tried. I deleted, burned, studied the black arts, everything. But the journal would always come back, there on my iPad, my phone, my new computer, like a lost copy infecting everything I read. And then I knew the answer. I needed to pass the journal, and only by passing it on would I beat the terror. The infection insisted I forward it. It knew if I did. So I passed it. To you, that is. There’s a lot of guilt associated with this decision, but for me, the wolves have gone. My only advice is to pass it unread if you can. The terror of your worst imaginings will come quickly, merciless, and soon.

Even now, I can sense you thinking of where your personal terror lies. There. Right then. You thought about your specific thing, didn’t you? The thing you told no one, the thing that drives shame in your mind when you give it a little poke. If words on a page can dictate a slight flash of your thinking about your worst fear, the one you tuck in the closet you dare not open, what else can words do, can prose do? How far can a story on a page take your imagination? And what if something writing those words knew what they were doing and had special intent? An unhuman intent. Evil. And then takes you to a place you aren’t coming back from, a place where terror lives in your worst nightmare, a non-ceasing agony, a place waiting for each of us, waiting for you.


July 09, 2023 03:36

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23 comments

Michał Przywara
21:59 Jul 10, 2023

Very nice :) Outstanding opening, with an ominous declaration of "The words change" - we simply must know more. And then in quick order, we go from breakfast to funeral. And *then*, the twist. It's a really cool idea, a new form of horrible chain letter, but then you get to pondering how it works, and I think you hit on something interesting. Reading the mind to identify fear, a custom horror story generated for the reader - this sounds like a real product we might see within the next decade or so. You even mentioned AI. Leave it to humans ...

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Jack Kimball
18:06 Jul 15, 2023

Thanks as always Michal!

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Mary Bendickson
12:07 Jul 09, 2023

The words are changing.

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Jack Kimball
21:41 Jul 09, 2023

Thanks Mary for reading. Still in draft mode.

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Aidan Romo
18:45 Jan 26, 2024

It's a tad uncanny how similar my first Reedsy submission is to this story in terms of how it's narrated and even in tone. That aside, this was excellent. Engaging read with a thought provoking, intriguing take on the malicious capability words may possess in tapping into the things we keep locked away. Some tense narration as well hammers further the terror of this story's concepts.

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Jack Kimball
20:00 Jan 26, 2024

Hi Aidan, Yes. I see what you mean with your piece, 'Shadow" and mine, 'The Words Change'. Both somber, both in first person, both with a haunting of sorts. Again, kind of a stab at an idea but needs development to stand up. Thanks for reading and commenting!

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Helen A Smith
17:48 Aug 16, 2023

Powerful and immediately hooks the reader in. Disturbing and well-written piece.

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Jack Kimball
01:49 Aug 17, 2023

Thank you for reading and commenting Helen!

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C. A. Janke
22:06 Jul 18, 2023

One of my favourite "niche" tropes in horror is when the reader or viewer is brought in to be a character-or a victim!-and this was so perfectly done! Especially when the context is the Internet specifically since the virality of the Internet and the fact it can make a digital virus like this so devastating. Made me feel like I'm becoming part of a new urban legend! Very fun read!

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Jack Kimball
22:50 Jul 18, 2023

Thank you C.A. I'm flattered you enjoyed it and hope to 'raise my game' someday to the depth of imagery found in your stories.

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Russell Mickler
01:39 Jul 17, 2023

Hey there, Jack! Really liked the opening! What does "garlic occulted" mean - I tried looking it up? grin - this got pretty meta quickly :) It reads like a Twlight Zone or a Black Mirror episode. I like how you speak to the reader and related ideas as communicable. The rise of anxiety with some interesting images (wolves, "... liked my carotid artery with his purple tongue"). Grin - you mentioned a Victorian gate and I thought - for a moment - that you were quoting my work for this prompt :) and that you were bringing in other Reedsy auth...

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Jack Kimball
02:27 Jul 17, 2023

Thank you Russell. An occultation is an event that occurs when one object is hidden from the observer by another object that passes between them. The term is often used in astronomy, but can also refer to any situation in which an object in the foreground blocks from view (occults) an object in the background. So garlic occulted means ‘garlic hidden’ if you will. Which is a lot more than I knew when I wrote it because basically I just liked the phrase. I like the concept of alluding to other submissions. That might be fun. Rip on some of ...

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Russell Mickler
03:43 Jul 17, 2023

That's freekin' awesome - I'll remember that use of the word! Thank you! Hehe Admittedly, I did have to go back and re-read sections of your story thinking you were doing meta-references on other stories in this prompt! Freaky, right?! hehehe R

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Rabab Zaidi
15:08 Jul 15, 2023

Really scary !!

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Jack Kimball
18:06 Jul 15, 2023

Thank you Rabab. That was the intent.

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Marty B
00:09 Jul 15, 2023

For a collection of readers what could be more horror-inducing then a story that doesn't stay put. 'The Words change' - every reader brings their own experience into what they read, their own wishes and their own fears. Great one! I like this line- 'The thing you told no one, the thing that drives shame in your mind when you give it a little poke. If words on a page can dictate a slight flash of your thinking about your worst fear, the one you tuck in the closet you dare not open; what else can words do, can prose do?'

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Jack Kimball
18:04 Jul 15, 2023

Thank you Marty!

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J. D. Lair
06:00 Jul 14, 2023

What a thrill Jack! My heart is racing. Well done!

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Jack Kimball
18:05 Jul 15, 2023

I appreciate you reading and commenting J.D.!

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J. D. Lair
18:28 Jul 15, 2023

Anytime my friend! :)

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Lily Finch
05:45 Jul 10, 2023

Jack, so masterfully done. I was delighted with your story. Your voice and pacing were excellent. The woman knows her man. What a horrible thing to pass on to someone else. I wonder if you've considered looking at the first piece and where you cut to the break (speaking directly to the reader.) cut it off earlier? LF6 I only saw one tiny typo. they onto others. - then?

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Jack Kimball
14:09 Jul 10, 2023

Thank you Lily. I saw your point about breaking earlier, and stripped out a lot of the earlier part. Flowed faster. Appreciate you reading and thinking about how it could be better!

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Lily Finch
14:23 Jul 10, 2023

You are welcome. This piece is fantastic. I hope my comments are helpful. I am glad it made your story better. LF6

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