Tag Archive: writing

Was Swearing in my Book Title a Sh*tty Idea?

There's More to Life than a Shitty Cubicle

When not traveling the world, Jeff Wheeland lives in California with his wife and baby daughter. This is his first novel and he may even write another if anyone likes this one. Hell, he may even write another if no one likes this one. In this article, Jeff talks about his decision to swear in the title of his novel, how doing so affected the marketability of his novel, and the role that sensitive language plays in the publishing industry.

Worldbuilding Resources for Historical Fiction Writers

Amy Arden: Worldbuilding in historical fiction

Amy Arden is a history enthusiast. She holds a graduate degree from the University of Kent at Canterbury where some of her happiest moments involved unfurling parchment at Canterbury Cathedral Archives. In this article, she talks about the challenge of worldbuilding in historical fiction — and how attention to detail can make or break a reader’s experience and the authenticity of a story. Luckily, she has also provided a list of resources where authors can go to research such details.

What to Expect From Beta Readers And Where to Find Them

G.D. Leon is a novelist with roots in the German language. He grew up in Zurich and now lives in the greater New York area, with his beautiful wife. Stations on his journey included Berlin and Buenos Aires, leaving impressions that remain until today. In 2016, he published “The Frigorifico”, but not before undergoing a thorough testing process with alpha and beta readers. In this article he shares how other authors can get the most out of working with test readers, and where to find them.

How to Start a Story: 9 Tips From Our Editors

How to Start a Story - The Hobbit

The opening lines of a novel act as an invitation for the reader to keep reading — it’s like the white rabbit showing up and asking Alice to follow him. The reader has to decide whether to follow despite not knowing what will happen next, and it is the writer’s job to convince them to go down the rabbit hole. Whether you’re just getting started on a novel or revisiting Page 1 of a first draft, Reedsy Editors are here to help with tips for how to start a story, with literary examples from a few favourites.

The True Cost of Self-Publishing a Book

The True Cost of Self-Publishing

Michael Doane is the author of  “The Crossing” and book strategist at Writing Inbound. When he’s not writing novels, he’s working with other authors to promote, launch, and sell their books. In this article, he talks about the budget he set for self-publishing his debut novel, “The Crossing” and how he was able to stick to it. 

Self-Publishing vs Traditional Publishing: Which one is right for you?

Self-Publishing vs Traditional Publishing

In the current publishing landscape, one of biggest consideration an author faces is whether traditional publishing is still their best path to success. In the past, the only way to get your book into the hands of readers was by working with a publisher who could get your book into stores. With the rise of online retailers and ebooks, any author can now access millions of potential readers without the backing of a HarperCollins or a Random House. In this post, we look at the benefits and drawbacks of both traditional publishing and self-publishing. With the help of a short... View Article

CEO and Novelist: An Entrepreneur’s Experience of the Self-Publishing Industry

In 2004, Leonora Meriel founded and managed Ukraine’s largest Internet company. In 2008, after becoming CEO of the company, Leonora decided to return to her dream of being a writer, and went on to self-publish her first novel, “The Woman Behind the Waterfall”. In this guest post, she discusses how her entrepreneurial background inspired her to follow her dream, and how it prepared her to take on the publishing industry.

Writing in Third Person Omniscient vs Third Person Limited

third person omniscient vs third person limited

You may have a clear vision for what or who your book is about — but do you know how to tell your story? One of the first major decisions you’ll face as an author is determining the style of narration in your book. Is your story best served by writing in first person, third person, or — if you’re feeling adventurous — second person? In this post, we’ll be looking at the options available to authors writing in the third person: omniscient and limited. In third person omniscient narration, the narrator has a god’s eye view of the story... View Article