Tag Archive: writing

Learn What Irony (Really) Is and How To Use It

What is irony?

Irony. We know it when we see it, but few of us can articulate what irony really is without relying on half-remembered lyrics from the 1995 Alanis Morissette song, “Ironic.” But it’s critical for writers to understand irony, which can add depth to conflict — or, in certain cases, make conflict feel hackneyed and stale. In this article, we will define and analyze different types of irony, and examine how to use irony successfully in your writing. Finally, we’ll dispel the notion that rain on your wedding day is ironic — a concept that, ironically enough, isn’t ironic at all.

12 Types of Travel Writing Every Writer Should Know

Types of travel writing - Cover

So, you want to be a travel writer? There are plenty of reality doses out there already, so we’re going to focus on the positives, and what you can do to maximize your chances of travel writing professionally. One of the first steps: you should absolutely know your markets, and what types of travel writing are popular in them. In today’s competitive market, this knowledge can both help you structure your article and target the right audience.

5 Simple Marketing Strategies for First-Time Authors

Brent Jones recently gave up his freelance career as a social media manager to pursue creative writing full-time. At the end of this past February, he published his debut novel, The Fifteenth of June, and in the following month, Brent has been focused on what he knows to be an equally important part of an author’s job: marketing. In this article, he shares 5 simple marketing strategies that all first-time authors can (and should!) try, and how his efforts have already started to pay off.

28 of the Best #WritingTips from Twitter

Writing Tips from Twitter

The average author’s relationship with social media is getting more complicated by the day. On one hand, it’s an essential tool for marketing and building connections with your readers. On the other hand, it’s a common distraction from the actual business of writing. And while social media (and Twitter, especially) gets a bad rap as a place where trolls go to insult artists and politicians, it can also be a place where authors share experiences and motivate one another. Knowing this, we’ve scoured for #WritingTips on Twitter and collected our favorite 28 pieces of advice for authors. On Outlining 1.... View Article

Was Swearing in my Book Title a Sh*tty Idea?

There's More to Life than a Shitty Cubicle

When not traveling the world, Jeff Wheeland lives in California with his wife and baby daughter. This is his first novel and he may even write another if anyone likes this one. Hell, he may even write another if no one likes this one. In this article, Jeff talks about his decision to swear in the title of his novel, how doing so affected the marketability of his novel, and the role that sensitive language plays in the publishing industry.

Worldbuilding Resources for Historical Fiction Writers

Amy Arden: Worldbuilding in historical fiction

Amy Arden is a history enthusiast. She holds a graduate degree from the University of Kent at Canterbury where some of her happiest moments involved unfurling parchment at Canterbury Cathedral Archives. In this article, she talks about the challenge of worldbuilding in historical fiction — and how attention to detail can make or break a reader’s experience and the authenticity of a story. Luckily, she has also provided a list of resources where authors can go to research such details.

What to Expect From Beta Readers And Where to Find Them

G.D. Leon is a novelist with roots in the German language. He grew up in Zurich and now lives in the greater New York area, with his beautiful wife. Stations on his journey included Berlin and Buenos Aires, leaving impressions that remain until today. In 2016, he published “The Frigorifico”, but not before undergoing a thorough testing process with alpha and beta readers. In this article he shares how other authors can get the most out of working with test readers, and where to find them.

How to Start a Story: 9 Tips From Our Editors

How to Start a Story - The Hobbit

The opening lines of a novel act as an invitation for the reader to keep reading — it’s like the white rabbit showing up and asking Alice to follow him. The reader has to decide whether to follow despite not knowing what will happen next, and it is the writer’s job to convince them to go down the rabbit hole. Whether you’re just getting started on a novel or revisiting Page 1 of a first draft, Reedsy Editors are here to help with tips for how to start a story, with literary examples from a few favourites.