Tag Archive: traditional publishing

What do Women Writers Want from an Editor?

Laurie Garrison, Ph.D. is the director of Women Writers School, a blog and course provider that works mainly with female authors. She has recently self-published a manifesto for her business, Women Writers in the Twenty-First Century. Previously, she was a university lecturer, an internationally renown critic of Victorian literature and the author of the book, Science, Sexuality and Sensation Novels: Pleasures of the Senses. The online world is bursting with free advice for writers. Everywhere I look I see articles geared toward helping the writer shape her emails, pitches, proposals, synopses and, above all, her manuscripts into something an agent, editor or... View Article

Self-Publishing vs Traditional Publishing: Which one is right for you?

Self-Publishing vs Traditional Publishing

In the current publishing landscape, one of biggest consideration an author faces is whether traditional publishing is still their best path to success. In the past, the only way to get your book into the hands of readers was by working with a publisher who could get your book into stores. With the rise of online retailers and ebooks, any author can now access millions of potential readers without the backing of a HarperCollins or a Random House. In this post, we look at the benefits and drawbacks of both traditional publishing and self-publishing. With the help of a short... View Article

Why I Self-Publish My Literary Fiction

Self-publish literary fiction Jane Davis

Self-published books are still largely associated with genre novels, while authors tend to turn to traditional publishers for literary fiction. We were curious to hear from someone who has been challenging labels and going against industry wisdom to carve her own niche in the publishing world. Indie author Jane Davis used to be bullied into changing her work just to fit into an easily marketable category. She decided to take matters into her own hands and self-publish her daring, award-winning fiction.  Eimear McBride used the platform provided by her various competition wins to urge publishers to back challenging fiction. McBride had spent... View Article

Do I Need a Literary Agent to Find a Publisher?

Do I need a literary agent header

How important is it to have a literary agent to find a publisher? Writers & Artists Editor Alysoun Owen shares her experiences on the role of literary agents in the publishing industry. Who are they, what do they do, and should you find yourself one? Read to find out. Do I need a literary agent? The answer to this much-mooted question asked by thousands of first-time authors is ‘Yes’ (with the parenthetical caveat of ‘But sometimes no’). Allow me to explain… Nearly all fiction – for adults, YA and children – reaches a publisher via a literary agent, a person... View Article

“I’m a huge fan of self-publishing” — An interview with literary agent David Fugate

David Fugate Interview

You know we like to bring you some of publishing’s most forward-thinking voices here on the Reedsy blog. This interview is one we’ve been meaning to do for a while, so you won’t be disappointed… David Fugate is the founder of LaunchBooks Literary Agency. He had worked as a literary agent for 20 years before setting it up, and now represents renowned authors such as Andy Weir (author of The Martian), Scott Berkun (previously interviewed on this blog), or Chris Guillebeau. He has successfully represented a wide range of fiction and nonfiction projects to more than 40 different publishers that have generated in excess of... View Article

“My old publisher made mistakes I wouldn’t tolerate” – The story of Greg White’s The Pink Marine

Digital formats have opened countless new ways to publication for authors, and if you aren’t afraid of taking advantage of those, you can pretty much turn any situation in your favour. Greg White, author of The Pink Marine, came to Reedsy a month ago and told us he had left his publisher shortly after his first book’s publication. Immediately, we thought “that’s an interesting story for our blog!” So here’s Greg sharing his experience with us, and his advice for newer authors.