Tag Archive: self-publishing

5 Simple Marketing Strategies for First-Time Authors

Brent Jones recently gave up his freelance career as a social media manager to pursue creative writing full-time. At the end of this past February, he published his debut novel, The Fifteenth of June, and in the following month, Brent has been focused on what he knows to be an equally important part of an author’s job: marketing. In this article, he shares 5 simple marketing strategies that all first-time authors can (and should!) try, and how his efforts have already started to pay off.

Using Tricks of the Librarian Trade to Market my Book

Melodee Elliott may have been new to self-publishing when she released her debut novel, The Assumption Code, earlier this year. However, having a Master’s Degree in Library Sciences, she’s no stranger to looking for books. In this article, she talks about how she put the theories she learned in her degree to practical use when it came to marketing her novel and thinking like a reader.

4 Things That Surprised me About Self-Publishing an Academic Book

Academic Self-Publishing

Joshua Gans is a Professor of Strategic Management at the University of Toronto. He has been published in the American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, RAND Journal of Economics, Journal of Economic Perspectives, and more. In this article, he talks about his recent book, Scholarly Publishing and its Discontents, which looks at the market power of journal publishers. The critical nature of this subject led him to explore self-publishing for the first time — an experience which surprised him in more ways than one.

Two Types of Writers: Plotters and Pantsers

Plotter or Pantser

Writing has always been a passion for the UK-based former journalist Amanda Wills, who now works part-time as a police press officer. Her latest book, Flick Henderson and the Deadly Game, was published in December last year, with a cover design courtesy of Reedsy artist Rachel Lawston. In this article, she talks about two types of writers, Plotters and Pantsers, and the pros and cons of both. Plotter or Pantser Do you plan your novel to the nth degree before you type a single word, or do you sit at your computer, take a deep breath and fly by the... View Article

Was Swearing in my Book Title a Sh*tty Idea?

There's More to Life than a Shitty Cubicle

When not traveling the world, Jeff Wheeland lives in California with his wife and baby daughter. This is his first novel and he may even write another if anyone likes this one. Hell, he may even write another if no one likes this one. In this article, Jeff talks about his decision to swear in the title of his novel, how doing so affected the marketability of his novel, and the role that sensitive language plays in the publishing industry.

How Reading Comic Books Improved My Writing

Dr. Franklin Warsh is an Investigating Coroner and retired family doctor who lives in London, Ontario. While writing his first full-length book, The Flame Broiled Doctor (a memoir of his experiences working in the health care system), Frank Warsh realized that his many years of reading comic books had not just been an enjoyable pastime, but a lesson in writing. Read on to learn more about the storytelling tips comic books provided him — including stories within stories, and archetype inspiration.

How “Write What You Know” Helps You Find a Target Market

When she was 26, Fiona MacBain moved to Tunisia and ran a watersports base near Sousse with her local husband (more about that at fionamacbain.com). She returned to the UK with her 6-month old daughter in 1999 and eventually settled in Inverness, where she lives with her husband and children. In this article, she talks about turning her memoir into fiction and how “write what you know” can be a sales tool when marketing your book.