Tag Archive: book marketing

Amazon Ads for Authors: Two Case Studies Showing They Do Work

amazon ads for authors case studies

Amazon ads have been the talk of indie author town since Amazon opened its AMS platform to all KDP users in 2016. While Facebook ads become increasingly competitive, as Mark Dawson already predicted on this blog back in 2015, Amazon have made huge improvements to their advertising platform, and are progressively becoming one of the most favoured channels for marketing a book. Like any other advertising platform, the AMS platform comes with its own challenges and learning curve. And like any other platform, success largely depends on data analysis and iteration. In this post, we’ll analyze two case studies (one... View Article

18 Pieces of Publishing Advice From Our Authors

Publishing Advice From Our Authors

For the past two years, this blog has been home to the From Our Authors series: articles penned by authors on the Reedsy Network. They’ve kindly shared their publishing experiences with their fellow writers, filling us all in on what has worked (and not worked) for them. Straight from this well of knowledge, we’ve handpicked the 18 best pieces of advice from our authors.

11 Author Websites That Get It Right

Now that you’ve learned our 10 Tips on How to Make an Author Website, you’re probably ready to set up shop. If you’re itching to make a big impression but need a boost of creativity to get you started, check out the 11 author websites below. Each website was picked because it features an example of effective and personal author marketing.

How I Went From being an Indie Author to Scoring An Amazon Book Deal

Amazon Book Deal

Last year we spoke with author Natalie Barelli about striking a big item off her bucket list: writing and publishing her debut novel, Until I Met Her. Less than twelve months later, Natalie has been signed by Amazon’s thriller imprint Thomas & Mercer, and her novel is undergoing a re-release. In this article, she talks the bumpy road of self-publishing, one that for her has been full of trials and tribulations. However, she’s a true example of the saying, “If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.” In a year, Natalie has turned publishing mishaps into lessons, and, clearly, her... View Article

“How I Got my Indie Novel Into the Country’s Largest Brick-and-Mortar Chain” — By Carol Cooper

Carol Cooper is a journalist, author, and doctor. She writes for The Sun newspaper, broadcasts on TV and radio, and has a string of non-fiction books to her name including an award-winning textbook of medicine. In this post, Carol reveals how she got her latest novel, Hampstead Fever, into Britain’s largest chain of booksellers.

5 Simple Marketing Strategies for First-Time Authors

Brent Jones recently gave up his freelance career as a social media manager to pursue creative writing full-time. At the end of this past February, he published his debut novel, The Fifteenth of June, and in the following month, Brent has been focused on what he knows to be an equally important part of an author’s job: marketing. In this article, he shares 5 simple marketing strategies that all first-time authors can (and should!) try, and how his efforts have already started to pay off.

Using Tricks of the Librarian Trade to Market my Book

Melodee Elliott may have been new to self-publishing when she released her debut novel, The Assumption Code, earlier this year. However, having a Master’s Degree in Library Sciences, she’s no stranger to looking for books. In this article, she talks about how she put the theories she learned in her degree to practical use when it came to marketing her novel and thinking like a reader.

Was Swearing in my Book Title a Sh*tty Idea?

There's More to Life than a Shitty Cubicle

When not traveling the world, Jeff Wheeland lives in California with his wife and baby daughter. This is his first novel and he may even write another if anyone likes this one. Hell, he may even write another if no one likes this one. In this article, Jeff talks about his decision to swear in the title of his novel, how doing so affected the marketability of his novel, and the role that sensitive language plays in the publishing industry.