Contest #80 winner 🏆

A Terrible Thing Has Happened

Submitted for Contest #80 in response to: Write about a child witnessing a major historical event.... view prompt

162 comments

Feb 12, 2021

Historical Fiction Drama Inspirational

Note: Inspired by the children who found Virginia Woolf's body in The River Ouse in 1941 during World War II

A TERRIBLE THING HAS HAPPENED

There were two things Mrs L. M. Everland wasn’t.

She wasn’t married. Never had been.

And she wasn’t a good cook.

“It’s rabbit,” she said, putting the chipped white plate down in front of Tabatha, “or it was,” she added, turning away, wiping her hands on the old red dishcloth she so often had over one shoulder.

“I expect you’re used to much finer things. In London,” she said with that glimmer of amusement in her eye as she set the tea kettle on the stove to heat up for the fourth time that evening, and Tabatha sliced a not-quite-boiled potato from a tin in half with her fork, forgoing the blackened cubes of rabbit for now.

“Not much,” Tabatha answered after swallowing.

Mrs Everland sat down on the chair on the opposite side of the table with the kettle slowly boiling behind her. She moved the jam jar of Alstromeria from the centre of the table to one side so that they could see each other better, revealing the scorch mark in the middle of the table, and the old wax pockmarks in the old scrubbed pine table where the candle had been in the winter.

“Did someone give you those?” Tabatha asked, watching how the few wilting yellowed leaves among the green quivered slightly in the gentle breeze that came through the half-open window.

Mrs Everland smiled one of her secret smiles, gave the tiniest purse of her lips and reached out to touch one of the yellow leaves that fell neatly into her palm as if she had willed it.

“No,” she said, “I gave them to myself,” she smiled again, and held the tip of the leaf between her thumb and forefinger, twirling it so that the light caught the yellow and blotched brown turning it gold and bronze in the sunlight that stretched half-way across the table between them, “like Mrs Dalloway,” she paused again, “only I picked them myself, instead of buying them.”

“Who’s Mrs Dalloway?” Tabatha asked, and Mrs Everland drew in a very long, very slow breath, and then released it just as slowly. Peaceful, calm, always. As if she half-existed in a dream, but only inside the house, once outside the house she came alive only in the minds of the outsiders that mistook her for cruel and unkind.

Different.

“She’s a character,” she said, “in a book,” and then, leaning forward slightly across the table on her forearms, with hands both clasped about the leaf, she said “a very wonderful book, written by a very wonderful woman,” with her eyes glittering, dark and wide, and full of secrets yet and never to be told.

She stood up, slowly, early spring light in the dark auburn brown of unruly hair pinned with often-falling hairpins on the very top of her head, so that it fell about her face in curls she never seemed to brush. Early spring light that cast a fleeting warmth across her cheek, her lips, her chin, as she passed, to the shelf in the kitchen, a board she’d put up herself with mismatching black iron brackets, the emerald rings she wore, three of them, on every other finger of her right hand glinting as she carefully eased a book from between another and a big, clear glass jar of golden shining honeycomb.

She set the book down on the table in front of Tabatha, next to her plate, a well-thumbed paperback with Mrs Dalloway in painted black writing inside a yellow border.

She sat down again, reached across the table and slipped the leaf between the cover and the first page, “bookmark,” she said, then rested back in her chair, head to one side, regarding Tabatha with the faraway and yet all-seeing look that only women are ever capable of having, and women like Mrs Everland even more so.

“Do you miss them?” She asked, “your parents?” As if the question needed clarification, and Tabatha pushed the half-moon of the mealy white potato over with her fork while the tea kettle began its whistle, louder and louder, and louder until the silence came, and Mrs Everland had taken it from the stove and was pouring more tea into the big brown teapot.

“Here,” she set the little blue and turquoise glazed sugar bowl down in front of Tabatha, “use the last of it. As much as you want. There’s always the honey.”

That was what Mrs L. M. Everland was.

Kind.

-

The next morning, early, while the sparrows were still singing in the hedgerows and the spring sunshine was turning the shimmer of a light frost to the warmth of new green grass on the fields, Tabatha walked to school with the three other children evacuated to Rodmell, Lewes, a village somewhere amidst the South Downs.

Tabatha, Nancy, Letty and Constance, all four of them eleven years old, all four from the anonymity of London’s shroud of grey and white and the murmur of pigeons in the eaves and alcoves of looming grey brick buildings turned to rubble and the dull brown rats on the wet grey cobbles.

“I’ve heard things about Mrs Everland,” Nancy said, squinting into the sky, shielding her eyes while she watched the planes fly in the distance.

“What sort of things?” Tabatha asked, watching the dew-shined toes of her black boots as she walked.

“I heard she never leaves her house,” Letty said before Nancy had a chance to answer, turning, grinning, brown leather satchel bumping against her thigh.

“Well, I heard that she killed her husband. Poisoned him,” Nancy, who was tall for her age with two long plaits of chestnut hair, said this with a pointed look in Tabatha’s direction, “apparently,” she went on, “she cooked this huge, sumptuous feast for him, everything he liked, desert too, and he ate it, but he didn’t know she’s put poison in it first.”

“Don’t listen to her,” Constance whispered, leaning her head of tight blonde curls close to Tabatha’s own and interlinking her arm with hers.

Nancy glanced back again and grinned a toothy grin.

“Then what happened?” Letty asked, kicking a small white round stone that looked like one of Mrs Everland’s boiled potatoes into the grass from the track.

“Then,” Nancy drew in a breath, thoroughly enjoying her role as revealer of truths, “his blood turned to ice, just froze up in his body and he died in his chair, just sitting there before he’d even eaten the stewed pears. They say he was buried still holding his spoon because his body was so seized up they couldn’t get it out of his hand.”

Letty screwed up her face, opened her mouth to say something, and then closed it again.

“That’s not true,” Tabatha said, nonchalant, looking up now, edging on defiant should the weather have called for it.

“And how would you know?” Nancy asked, all but rolling her eyes.

“She told me,” she said, “when we first arrived. She said, ‘they’ll tell you about me, the people in the village, they’ll tell you I poisoned by husband, but I can tell you that’s not true.’” she quoted.

“Of course she’d tell you it wasn’t true,” Nancy laughed, “she’s not going to admit it, is she.”

“She’s never been married,” Tabatha added, and Nancy’s smile faltered slightly, “and,” now it was time for the nail in the proverbial coffin, “she can’t cook.”

Nancy ignored her, chose instead to look up again at the second arrow of warplanes heading north, engines burning up the sky and the silence and leaving a ring in the air that seemed always to be there, but never lasted longer than it took to see them disappear.

“Well I heard she never got married because she was having an affair,” Letty began, once they’d started walking again, this was her moment now, and she paused for effect, “with a woman.”

“Who?!” Nancy asked before she could stop herself, now it was Letty’s turn to look smug.

“A writer. She writes books, novels, she’s quite famous,” Letty said with an air of authority, “although Mother said they’re not appropriate, she writes stories about women who aren’t women at all, they act like men. One of them, Orlando, kept turning from a man to a woman and did…all sorts.”

Nancy’s face twisted from alarm, through intrigue, to suspicion, “how do you know?” She asked, and Tabatha felt the heaviness of Constance’s arm through her own, and the weight of Mrs Dalloway in her satchel, as she remembered the flush of Mrs Everland’s cheeks as she had set the book down so carefully beside her, ‘…a very wonderful woman…’

Around the corner, they bumped into Arrick, an elderly man with a dog they had passed every morning since last Tuesday, on their first day to school. He tipped his cap to them, stepped aside so that his earth-brown boots crunched the final frost beneath the hedges, and tugged the fraying string rope gently to bring the little black and white terrier dog to his heels.

“Mornin’,” he said, as he tipped his hat, the thinning blue-white skin beneath his eyes damp from the cold and his cheeks and nose a colourless grey pink as they smiled their replies, “There’s something afoot up there,” he raised his free arm that held a long hand-whittled cane and pointed stiffly with the end of it in the direction they were heading, “something going on,” he spoke slowly, and with an accent from further north.”

“What?” Nancy asked, all of them looking in the direction he pointed to, the place furthest from the rising sun, where the fields still glittered and shimmered with frost.

“I don’t know,” he lowered his stick, “men about, police by the looks of things, poking about in them woods with sticks and dogs, Mitsy were scared witless,” he tugged on the string so that the little dog with shivering legs looked up at him with blinking dark eyes and twitching black nose, “weren’t you?” he asked her, and she sat down in response, “I’d take the long way round if I were you, down by the river,” he pointed again with his stick in a more Westerly direction, where the fields hid the pathway that nobody but the locals expected, down to where The River Ouse abruptly sliced the landscape, small, snakelike and startlingly silver.

“Thank you,” Nancy gave their thanks as her own, quiet, unusually so for her, still looking in the direction of the woods that seemed all but a mist and smudge of grey on the horizon, “thank you,” she said again, suddenly realising her manners, turning, smiling, and realising he had already begun his shuffling stoop back on his way.

“Which way?” Letty asked, narrowing her eyes, like Nancy had, looking to the trees, seeing only what was perhaps her imagination moving between the trees.

“The river,” Tabatha said, “I know the way, Mrs Everland showed me the other day when we were foraging.”

Nancy looked at her in the sceptical way she had inherited from her school mistress mother, “foraging for what?” She asked, not yet quite convinced of Mrs Everland’s innocence.

“Mushrooms,” Tabatha said, already setting off, Constance’s hand still neatly tucked into the crook of her elbow, “and wild garlic,” she added, when Nancy and Letty began, begrudgingly, to follow.

“I thought she couldn’t cook?” Nancy asked as they turned down the lane in between the fields, the grass and the odd uncut blade of uncut wheat that brushed the backs of their knees.

“She can’t,” Tabatha and Constance stepped over a rabbit hole in unison, “but she does try,” she glanced briefly back at Nancy’s screwed up face, her feet wet inside her shoes from the grass, Letty trailing along behind her, “and the garlic was for a remedy she made, it has antibacterial properties,” she glanced again at Nancy, enjoying, fleetingly, the knowledge that when it came to Mrs Everland, she was the expert, as much as one could be, after knowing her only for a week.

“Sounds like witchcraft to me,” Letty said from the back, breathless and pale, unused to walking for longer than the time it would take to step from a London doorway to a carriage, but neither girl replied, they merely stopped, in a line, stopped without thinking, the grass in its dew-lit glory melted away to sand-coloured grit shot through with the glint of splinters of quartz and feldspar, and the water, flat, calm, both grey and silver, gold and white, sparkling beneath clouds that reflected the day in the cool of the water that ran, seemingly unmoving beneath the old stone bridge they would cross on their way to school.

“What’s that?” Letty asked, after a moment of silence where the air that smelled of fresh-cut grass and the early morning smell of the Earth warming held them, suspended within that moment.

“What?” Constance asked, quietly, not wanting to break the stillness.

Letty moved further down the slope toward the river, “that,” she pointed to what looked like the ebb and flow of fabric the same colour as both the water and the sky.

In silence, they followed Letty, Nancy just behind her, the soft bump-bump of four school satchels and the scuff of shoes on dry gravel and grit, the gentle lap of the water and the cheerful twittering of the birds the only sounds in this Rodmell morning.

“What is that?” Nancy asked, and Letty stopped, now only feet from the puckering fabric blooming and fading and blooming again from where the old tree branches and sticks had dammed up a corner beneath the bridge, then, slowly, ever so slowly, the colourless white of a hand, a knuckle, the glance of a gold wedding band on a finger swollen and water-logged, and the thin, long ripples that caught, not the fragile spindles of newly snapped twigs from the trees, but the grey-brown of hair that pulled and shimmered, and from somewhere in the near distance, from above, on the outskirts of the forest, a mans voice called, “Virginia?” in a voice that had called for too long.

-

That evening, in silence, Tabatha and Mrs Everland picked Alstromeria in the garden, the flowers of friendship, love, strength and devotion, of silent mutual support, and the ability to help each other through the trials and tribulations of life.

They picked one of each colour, and she set them in the window in an old enamel jug, in the dying light of day, for Orlando, for Mrs Dalloway.

For Virginia Woolf.

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162 comments

Zilla Babbitt
15:43 Feb 19, 2021

I adore your descriptions and the matter of fact dialogue. The small additions like alstromeria make the whole piece magical. Deserved win!

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10:35 Feb 23, 2021

Thank you ever so much for such a lovely, thoughtful comment, particularly about the smaller additions like the flowers!

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Michael Boquet
17:30 Feb 19, 2021

Obviously well researched. Feels true to the time period. Congrats.

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10:35 Feb 23, 2021

Thank you!

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Paula Martinek
16:57 Feb 19, 2021

Didn't know Virginia Woolf died that way. Very good story. Now have to google her history.

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19:59 Feb 19, 2021

You can enjoy the book (or the movie adaptation) The Hours, which follows it wonderfully!

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10:37 Feb 23, 2021

Isn't The Hours just wonderful! Kidman's portrayal of Woolf is spectacular.

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10:36 Feb 23, 2021

Enjoy discovering her works!

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Rachel Smith
17:34 Feb 19, 2021

Congratulations! I love the detailed description you use, very effective. I'm taking notes!

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10:36 Feb 23, 2021

That's very sweet of you, I'm very glad that you enjoyed the detail!

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Scout Tahoe
15:40 Feb 19, 2021

I don't usually read historical fiction, but this one is fabulous. Very well written and capturing. What a deserved win! Congrats.

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10:36 Feb 23, 2021

Thank you so much for such a lovely comment!

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well deserved win! great job!

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10:37 Feb 23, 2021

Thank you!

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Christina Marie
15:34 Feb 19, 2021

Natascha, this is incredible. You captured some really beautiful and tragic nuances of Woolf's work and life, even in small details. Mrs. Dalloway is one of my favourites. Thank you so much for sharing this, and congratulations on your well-earned win!

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10:39 Feb 23, 2021

What a lovely comment, thank you so much, Christina. It means a lot to hear that I captured some of the nuances of Woolf's work (and life), particularly in the small details. I have often written about her, and, if you would like to read it, a short story of mine (the fictional re-telling of the first meeting of Virginia Woolf & Vita Sackville-West) is published here: https://www.litromagazine.com/end-your-weekend-with-a-collection-of-the-best-stories-litro-magazine-has-to-offer/vita/

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Lori G
15:28 Feb 19, 2021

Congratulations!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! This is a beautiful story! It is perfect from the title to the very last word! WELL DESERVED WIN! I am glad you won! It is lovely! I love that it is about Virginia Woolf and that it is written so beautifully!!!

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10:41 Feb 23, 2021

This was such a lovely comment to receive, thank you, you have made my day and my time on here more wonderful.

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Wow, this was an amazing story! Congrats on the win! This is one of my favorite stories that won :)

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10:41 Feb 23, 2021

That's a very lovely thing to hear, thank you so, so much!

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Nainika Gupta
15:23 Feb 19, 2021

Amazing job with this story! well deserved win :)

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10:37 Feb 23, 2021

Thank you ever so much! :)

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Nainika Gupta
12:57 Feb 23, 2021

:) no problem!

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Cienna Johnson
22:19 Feb 25, 2021

Hi! I'm a 12-year-old author, and when I was reading your story, I couldn't help falling in love with the attention to detail and the natural dialogue. How everything just blended together. Great win.

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Laiba M
13:36 Feb 22, 2021

This is such a magical story while still showing you did your research!! Great job. It's hard to write historical fiction without the events turning into a textbook T-T

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10:42 Feb 23, 2021

Well, thank you very much! It's lovely to hear my work described as, "magical", thank you!

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Laiba M
13:49 Feb 23, 2021

Of course! I never exaggerate, haha~ Thank you for such an amazing story! Did anything inspire/push you to choose this historical period specifically?

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20:00 Feb 19, 2021

I loved the dialogue between the teenagers, and since it's the first time I take part in one of Reedsy's contests, it's great to see they pick stories based upon their intrinsic qualities and not the number of likes. Congratulations on your win!

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10:45 Feb 23, 2021

What a lovely thing to say! Thank you! Good luck with your writing!

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Chimwekele Okoro
19:25 Feb 19, 2021

This is an excellent story. A truly deserved win.

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10:46 Feb 23, 2021

Thank you so much!

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Raine Chandler
18:49 Feb 19, 2021

Your description is absolutely beautiful and your dialogue flows beautifully. Based on the style and imagery though, I can see why your story won. I really like how you played with the traditional story structure and placed the inciting moment at the end. There are a couple of typos and capitalisation errors, but nothing a thorough edit wouldn't sort out. I can see your passion in your writing. Keep up the good work.

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10:47 Feb 23, 2021

Thank you so much for such a lovely comment, Raine. I've been a professional full-time writer for a good many years now but yes, the typos and errors still slip through every now and then.

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17:07 Feb 19, 2021

Congrats Natascha!🎉🎊

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10:39 Feb 23, 2021

Thank you!

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D Owen
16:40 Feb 19, 2021

Congratulations

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10:39 Feb 23, 2021

Thank you!

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16:35 Feb 19, 2021

Congratulations😍🥰❤️

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10:39 Feb 23, 2021

Thank you so much!

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Karen Kitchel
16:23 Feb 19, 2021

Congrats! Very well written with great descriptions.

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Courtney C
16:09 Feb 19, 2021

Congratulations on your win! I really loved your story ❤️

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10:39 Feb 23, 2021

Thank you so much! That's lovely to hear!

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