The Navy Blue Chevrolet

Submitted for Contest #50 in response to: Write a story told entirely through one chase scene.... view prompt

61 comments

Submitted on 07/16/2020

Categories: Thriller

The navy blue Chevrolet was parked right outside the Metro Cash and Carry supermarket. On the first glance, nothing seemed wrong with it. But if one looked at it for even another second, they would know something was wrong.

It was hard to pinpoint what that was. It was nothing too conspicuous, like a broken headlight or a flat tire. No, it was just the subtle aura that seemed to surround the car. It was like a little pool of poison, slowly spreading, growing larger, seeping into everything it touched.

It was no surprise that the parking spaces around the car were all empty.

The woman who owned the navy blue Chevrolet was a child prodigy in music. She had begun singing at the age of two, played the piano, the guitar, the sitar (an Indian stringed instrument) and was generally a brilliant musician.

She once heard a few seconds of a mazurka by Chopin as a ringtone, and had gone home and improvised a whole piece on the piano, using those few seconds as the theme. She was six at the time.

She was also, as a prodigy normally is, a little on the eccentric side. She never liked her parents’ home garden, and had torn up the whole thing, one night. She was rarely awake before twelve noon, and was rarely asleep by twelve midnight.

She quit music after she lost in a singing competition at the age of sixteen and moved out of her parents’ house. They lost contact with her after that.

The woman was now thirty years old, happily forgotten, and was living a half-decent life. She had just finished buying her weekly supply of groceries from the Metro supermarket. She unlocked the Chevrolet and opened the boot.

She pushed the large duffel bag that had been lying there since morning to the back and stuffed the two bags of provisions she had bought inside.

She walked slowly to the driver’s side, looking at everyone and everything near her suspiciously.

It was a few minutes before she opened the door and got in. She reversed the car and exited the tall iron gates of the supermarket, heading for the highway.

The traffic was slow, and it was almost half an hour before the woman got to the tollbooth.

“A ticket. Single.” she said to the man inside.

“Twenty.”

She rummaged around in her purse and handed him a crumpled note. He took it, barely glancing at her and let her through.

The woman picked up speed. If she had to get home by five o’ clock, she had to drive fast. She hummed a little sad tune to herself as she drove; the only extent of her return to music. It was a different tune every time, and original too. However long ago it was when she dropped music, she never lost her composing abilities.

She was doing sixty kilometres an hour now. It was a long way to her exit.

She glanced around at the traffic. There were a few lumbering trucks towards the very left and a gleaming silver Audi that slowed down next to her car, then suddenly roared and shot forward.

Ahead was a large white van, with a picture of a famous politician splashed across both sides. A popular slogan of the party was painted on the back, but some letters had long since fallen off.

She had sped up to eighty kilometres an hour. The engine of the Chevrolet hummed, as the car switched gears. She could hear the pistons jump back and forth, at alarming speeds. If she listened intently, though, she could hear the pistons move even at twenty kilometres an hour.

She glanced at the odometer and smiled; a lopsided smile, that showed off her left premolars and molars. She was a few kilometres from hitting a lakh.

All was quiet for a few moments. Then, the shrill, piercing shriek of an ambulance. She glanced at the rear-view mirror. It was directly behind her, but still a while away. Nevertheless, she swung to the other lane, interrupting a red Toyota’s speeding streak.

The ambulance rocketed past, shuddering and shaking from the speed. The woman was concerned; it seemed like the ambulance could fall apart any moment. It sped up further and soon disappeared from view.

The woman herself had increased her speed from eighty to a hundred kilometres an hour. The little red marker of the speedometer had hovered around indecisively for a minute, swinging like a pendulum between ninety and ninety-five, before the woman had gotten annoyed and sped up to a hundred.

She looked at the rear-view mirror for the second time. A frown knitted her thin, angular brows together. She looked vaguely annoyed, as though a fly was constantly buzzing around her. It was the police car; it had been following her since the time she had left the supermarket.

She sped up much more, gunning for her exit. She didn’t know why, but her grip on the wheel became much stronger, her heart thundered against her rib-cage, and her breathing became faster. She shook her head and forced herself to calm down.

Nothing will happen, she thought to herself, they’re not looking for you.

But it seemed as though they were. They took the same exit she did, and followed her past the heavy traffic of a junction.

The woman was now beginning to get worried. She swung sharply to the left into a thin deserted alley, hoping they’d leave her, but no luck. The police car, for all its lumbering weight, made the turn quite easily.

She pushed the Chevrolet’s engine to its maximum, hitting a hundred and twenty kilometres an hour, before slowing down when she hit the main road.

She had seen enough movies to know how to lose cops on your trail, but now that she was faced with that situation in real life, it turned out to be much, much harder than she thought.

“Goddamn it!” she muttered to herself. “Movie guys have it so easy. Just one turn and a dramatic jump, the cops are off their tail.”

She wrenched the wheel to the right, the tires skidding and squealing as they spun to do her bidding. She could swear she smelled burnt rubber. The Chevrolet shot through two particularly menacing looking trucks, just making it through.

The woman inside sighed in relief. The police car was off her trail. Wait. No, there it was, cruising along smoothly, just twenty or so metres behind her. How was that possible?

“Oh, heck,” she said. “I can’t goddamn lose them!”

The chase continued for ten more minutes; an entertaining game of cat-and-mouse, but extremely frustrating for the supposed mouse.

In the end, the woman gave up. She screeched to a halt in front of a large shopping mall. The police car did the same, behind her.

The woman sat there, not moving, waiting. She was still clutching the steering wheel.

The police officer approached the shotgun’s window. He was short and had a thin mustache. He looked about fifty years old, with a large bald spot right on the top of his crown. He was sweating in the heat of the afternoon.

He knocked on the window, and the woman inside slowly lowered it. Her heart was running a marathon, and adrenaline coursed through every fiber of her body.

“Good afternoon, Ma’am,” the police officer said. “We were just on our way to the police station, down the street there,” he gestured, “and we couldn’t help but notice you were doing almost a hundred and fifty kilometres an hour. In case you hadn’t noticed, Ma’am, that is twice the speed limit in this area. So, much as we dislike doing this to taxpayers, Ma’am, we are forced to book you for speeding.” He handed the woman a ticket.

The woman’s breath caught. Her heart skipped a beat. She held out a shaky hand and almost ripped the ticket as she took it from him.

“You can come to pay the fine at the desk in this police station,” he jabbed a podgy thumb towards the police station down the street, “anytime. Talk to the man outside. He’ll help you.”

The woman nodded. The police officer didn’t go, as she thought (and was hoping) he would. He looked around for a moment, and then said, “Excuse me, Ma’am, but I’ll also need to see a license and the ownership papers.”

“Yes.” the woman said. Her voice came out raspy and hoarse; not her usual melodious tone. She reached over and opened the glove compartment. She rummaged around for a moment, then handed him her driver’s license.

“Thank you.” He squinted at the little plastic card. She handed him the ownership papers.

He scanned them quickly and said, “Thank you, Ma’am. I must say, this is a damn fine car you’ve got.”

“Thank you.” Her heart was beating faster again.

“Say, you wouldn’t happen to know where we could find a good vegetarian restaurant here, would you? My partner back in the car doesn’t eat meat or egg. Personally, I eat both. Especially chicken. I know it’s common and stuff, but there’s nothing as fine as a well-cooked chicken-”

“I think there’s one inside this mall.” The woman interrupted, pointing towards the large red building behind the police officer.

“Thank you,” he nodded. “I’ll be leaving now, and don’t speed again.”

“I won’t.”

The police officer walked back to his car, then his partner accompanied him inside the mall. The woman exhaled shakily. Her head was pounding, and her breath was coming out in rapid gasps.

“Too close,” she kept saying. “Too close.”

She sat still for a few minutes, hands on the steering wheel, then got out and opened the boot. She dragged the large brown duffel bag a little closer and unzipped it. The corners of her lips curved into a small smile, as she stared at the body of the little boy with a knife sticking out of his chest lying in the duffel bag, an expression of horror on his face.



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61 comments

Jonathan Blaauw
12:35 Jul 29, 2020

I always enjoy unexpected endings. This was good, well done. You’ve got the tension going with the chase nicely, and I love the way you start with the evil aura of the car. Also, I’ve been to India, so I know what a lakh is and I also know that a highspeed chase in Delhi traffic would be terrifying for anyone, despite what they may or may not have in a duffel in the boot. Very good portrayal. Twists are tricky because you want to surprise the reader but almost in a way they should have seen coming, but didn’t. If that makes sense? Your twis...

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Nandan Prasad
12:58 Jul 29, 2020

Thanks so much! Your feedback really means a lot. I see your point about the motive, but I got this idea only two days before the contest ended, so I just busted it out as quickly as possible. Maybe if I publish it later, I'll think about that. Thank you so much.

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Nisha Mohan
19:03 Jul 27, 2020

Dear Nandan, My gosh, you are one heck of a writer! The last line was so unanticipated! But good narrative. I am an a new author, my recent book being, 'An Unforgettable Holiday - What Happens When Love Has No Boundaries- If you get some time, do read and leave a review :) Regards Nisha Mohan

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Nandan Prasad
01:55 Jul 28, 2020

Thanks! Sure, I will check out your book!

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Karin Venables
14:01 Jul 27, 2020

I knew from the time she shoved the grey duffel back into the boot, she had something to hide. The terror of being chased by the police was real to her in a whole different way from most. The prodigy has turn into a murderer. I wonder who the boy was, her son or someone else's? You did a fabulous job of describing the chase and the emotions that went with it. Well written,

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Nandan Prasad
01:53 Jul 28, 2020

Thanks so much!

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Nandan Prasad
01:54 Jul 28, 2020

Be sure to check out my other stories too if you have time.

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Djenat Remmache
21:26 Jul 23, 2020

No one expected the ending, well done! Check my new story when you find time :)

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Nandan Prasad
03:25 Jul 24, 2020

Thanks! Sure, I will surely check out your story soon.

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A. S.
04:52 Jul 28, 2020

The ending of this story was totally unexpected! Throughout the entire story there was a sense of dread building in my stomach! Good job. I am really excited to read more of your stories. If you would be willing to check out my newest story “Gone” that would be great!

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Nandan Prasad
05:01 Jul 28, 2020

Thanks so much! I'll check out your story soon.

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Nandan Prasad
05:01 Jul 28, 2020

Like if you enjoyed!

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Writers Block
02:40 Jul 28, 2020

Oooo...sequel please....

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Nandan Prasad
05:00 Jul 28, 2020

Thanks! I was actually thinking of writing a prequel; how she murdered the boy. Do you think I should?

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Writers Block
12:28 Jul 29, 2020

Yes

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Nandan Prasad
05:00 Jul 28, 2020

Do check out my other stories too if possible. Thanks!

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Nandan Prasad
05:02 Jul 28, 2020

Like if you enjoyed!

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10:36 Jul 21, 2020

Woah! Being a sucker for thrillers and suspense, I tend to notice details in stories. I did notice it when you mentioned she pushed it inside and kept her groceries, but you managed to hide it well till the twist in the end. Extremely well-written. Looking forward to more from you! ✌️✌️

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Nandan Prasad
11:35 Jul 21, 2020

Thanks!

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Tiffany Hua
23:47 Jul 18, 2020

I love the story, I'm obsessed! I didn't expect the plot twist at the end! Care to read mine?

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Nandan Prasad
03:34 Jul 19, 2020

Wow, thanks so much! Sure, I'd love to read yours.

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Roshna Rusiniya
13:33 Jul 16, 2020

Oh! The twist at the end! I wasn’t expecting that! Well done!

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Nandan Prasad
15:01 Jul 16, 2020

Thank you so much!

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Ashley Patterson
14:32 Aug 04, 2020

Very good had me lingering on to every word

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Nandan Prasad
05:08 Aug 05, 2020

Thanks a lot!

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Joshua Portugal
10:36 Aug 04, 2020

So I checked out your story. Daaaaamnn. The ending. The woman was a freaking psychopath. Really loved it, Nandan. Even I was sweating.

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Nandan Prasad
12:34 Aug 04, 2020

Thanks so much!

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Dj clair Wy
22:16 Aug 02, 2020

excellent story,i did not see that coming

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Nandan Prasad
03:29 Aug 03, 2020

Thanks so much! Like if you enjoyed!

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Christina Hall
15:33 Aug 02, 2020

I enjoyed your story, and the ending. You did a good job of showing the tension she was feeling.

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Nandan Prasad
15:39 Aug 02, 2020

Thanks!

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Barbara Burgess
11:14 Aug 02, 2020

ooooo - creepy! I really enjoyed your story and the ending - very well done!

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Nandan Prasad
15:28 Aug 02, 2020

Thanks a lot!

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Leya Newi
14:00 Aug 01, 2020

This is the second story of yours I’ve read, and I love your writing style. It’s absolutely gorgeous, so for sure keep writing. Don’t ever stop!! And the ending... I relaxed a little when the police officer didn’t catch her for whatever she had done (I hadn’t even realized I had tensed up, the story was so gripping) and then you pull out the boy-stabbed-through-the-chest card, and I started again. As with your other stories, brilliant job.

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Nandan Prasad
03:40 Aug 02, 2020

Thanks so much! Really means a lot to me.

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Sayani Sarkar
16:54 Jul 31, 2020

Jesus Christ. That was scary. There was so much eeriness in the story and the descriptions. I love a story that puts in so much effort into details. It was really nice and twisted :)

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Nandan Prasad
02:04 Aug 01, 2020

Thanks so much!

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Qazi zufar Jamal
06:22 Jul 30, 2020

Really unexpected ending!! The characterisation of the women is simply beautiful. Just a suggestion though : Don’t spoil it by writing a prequel or sequel. All the mystery buffs must expect what to come. It’s better to leave on individual readers Imagination 🤟 kudos

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Nandan Prasad
06:34 Jul 30, 2020

Okay, thanks! I'll probably not write a prequel. Please do check out my other stories if you have the time 😊

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Geneva Savage
17:29 Jul 29, 2020

Holy crap!! That was great :) I loved the ending!!! Completely unexpected. My heart was beating so hard throughout the whole chase too. Great job and good luck ;)

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Geneva Savage
17:35 Jul 29, 2020

Could you check out my new story Love, Leila? If you have the time. I'd love to know what you think!!

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Nandan Prasad
05:04 Jul 30, 2020

Thanks so much!

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Katrina Lee
09:22 Jul 29, 2020

Oh my rereading the first few paras felt menacing! I like the way you write dialogue:) keep it up!

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Nandan Prasad
11:43 Jul 29, 2020

Thanks so much!

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Abby Irwin
02:28 Jul 27, 2020

Nice story. The twist at the end was super unexpected. however people who might not want those types of pictures in their heads read the whole story not expecting that it could be bad for them and then have those images stuck in their heads. You can still write those types of stories I just wanted to ask that you put a warning sentence at the beginning of those stories. Thanks.

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Nandan Prasad
03:24 Jul 27, 2020

Thanks for the feedback. And sure, I'll keep that in mind next time.

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Abby Irwin
19:15 Jul 27, 2020

Sure, and thanks for keeping it in mind.

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